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DOES HOPE VI DEEP-SIX THE POOR? ANALYZING THE EFFECTS OF DISPLACEMENT FORMER RESIDENTS OF DISTRESSED PUBLIC HOUSING IN A MID-SIZED SOUTHERN CITY

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Date Issued:
2006
Abstract/Description:
Do downtown revitalization efforts detrimentally affect people who are displaced? HUD's HOPE VI grant program provides local housing authorities with funds to leverage private investment to demolish blighted, severely distressed public housing units and replace them with mixed-use, mixed-income units. In 2002, the OHA secured an $18 million grant to redevelop a public housing project then known as Carver Court. 212 units of public housing were razed and former public housing residents were displaced to make way for redevelopment. Interviews with 55 former residents of Carver Court are analyzed to determine the self-reported effects of the local implementation of federal housing policy. Outcomes measured include satisfaction with occupation, housing costs, neighborhood quality, crime, social interactions, access to public transportation, and quality of life overall, among others. In addition, the analysis uses Census data to examine the extent to which poverty deconcentration, a major policy goal of HOPE VI, has been accomplished. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of HOPE VI's position in the history of American housing policy.
Title: DOES HOPE VI DEEP-SIX THE POOR? ANALYZING THE EFFECTS OF DISPLACEMENT FORMER RESIDENTS OF DISTRESSED PUBLIC HOUSING IN A MID-SIZED SOUTHERN CITY.
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Name(s): Zeller, David, Author
Wright, James, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2006
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Do downtown revitalization efforts detrimentally affect people who are displaced? HUD's HOPE VI grant program provides local housing authorities with funds to leverage private investment to demolish blighted, severely distressed public housing units and replace them with mixed-use, mixed-income units. In 2002, the OHA secured an $18 million grant to redevelop a public housing project then known as Carver Court. 212 units of public housing were razed and former public housing residents were displaced to make way for redevelopment. Interviews with 55 former residents of Carver Court are analyzed to determine the self-reported effects of the local implementation of federal housing policy. Outcomes measured include satisfaction with occupation, housing costs, neighborhood quality, crime, social interactions, access to public transportation, and quality of life overall, among others. In addition, the analysis uses Census data to examine the extent to which poverty deconcentration, a major policy goal of HOPE VI, has been accomplished. Implications of the findings are discussed in terms of HOPE VI's position in the history of American housing policy.
Identifier: CFE0000995 (IID), ucf:46701 (fedora)
Note(s): 2006-05-01
M.A.
Graduate Studies College, Department of Sociology and Anthropology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): social policy
urban studies
poverty
evaluation
program design
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000995
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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