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A RELATIONAL DIFFUSION NETWORK STUDY OF SYNCHRONOUS AND ASYNCHRONOUS INTERNET-BASED FACULTY'S PERSONAL NETWORK EXPOSURE MODELS RELATED TO DISCUSSIONS ABOUT TEACHING ONLINE

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Date Issued:
2006
Abstract/Description:
For many faculty, teaching online represents a new instructional delivery method, requiring the development of new teaching skills. This exploratory investigation builds upon Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations theory and communication channels to describe the influence of faculty discussions on their perceptions and decisions about teaching and learning. A sequential explanatory mixed-methods research design, using both sociometric and phenomenological methodologies, guided the exploration of faculty personal network exposure models and social learning opportunities. The study utilized online survey and open-ended interview instruments for the investigation. Faculty from several colleges at the University of Central Florida voluntarily completed the survey instrument identifying with whom, how, and why they discuss teaching online, including the influence of these discussions. In-depth interviews offered internal descriptions of their personal networks. Survey results established baseline data for demographic and future comparisons and identified concerns, issues, and trends unique to synchronous and asynchronous Internet-based faculty development and support needs. Phenomenological data produced the emergent categories and themes used to investigate and explain faculty's communication channel usage and social learning experiences. Similarities between diffusion and knowledge research findings and participants reflected more conformity than anticipated. Differences in communication channel and learning style preferences and usage and faculty's 24/7 work life needs, present challenges to administrators and educators responsible for providing development and support systems.
Title: A RELATIONAL DIFFUSION NETWORK STUDY OF SYNCHRONOUS AND ASYNCHRONOUS INTERNET-BASED FACULTY'S PERSONAL NETWORK EXPOSURE MODELS RELATED TO DISCUSSIONS ABOUT TEACHING ONLINE.
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Name(s): Pick, Dorothy, Author
Orwig, Gary, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2006
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: For many faculty, teaching online represents a new instructional delivery method, requiring the development of new teaching skills. This exploratory investigation builds upon Rogers' (2003) Diffusion of Innovations theory and communication channels to describe the influence of faculty discussions on their perceptions and decisions about teaching and learning. A sequential explanatory mixed-methods research design, using both sociometric and phenomenological methodologies, guided the exploration of faculty personal network exposure models and social learning opportunities. The study utilized online survey and open-ended interview instruments for the investigation. Faculty from several colleges at the University of Central Florida voluntarily completed the survey instrument identifying with whom, how, and why they discuss teaching online, including the influence of these discussions. In-depth interviews offered internal descriptions of their personal networks. Survey results established baseline data for demographic and future comparisons and identified concerns, issues, and trends unique to synchronous and asynchronous Internet-based faculty development and support needs. Phenomenological data produced the emergent categories and themes used to investigate and explain faculty's communication channel usage and social learning experiences. Similarities between diffusion and knowledge research findings and participants reflected more conformity than anticipated. Differences in communication channel and learning style preferences and usage and faculty's 24/7 work life needs, present challenges to administrators and educators responsible for providing development and support systems.
Identifier: CFE0000967 (IID), ucf:46712 (fedora)
Note(s): 2006-05-01
Ed.D.
Education, Department of Educational Studies
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): diffusion of innovations
teaching online
university faculty
relational networks
learning community
communication
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0000967
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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