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THE 1980'S AND TODAY;AN ANALYSIS OF WOMEN'S SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING

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Date Issued:
2006
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this study is to augment the existing literature concerning the relationship between marital status, gender, social networks, and cohort effect on dimensions of subjective well-being for women. Multiple dimensions of subjective well-being are examined. Multiple regression and logistic regression are employed to examine the effects of marital status, social networks, and cohort effects on the dependent variables that tap the dimensions of subjective well-being. The analysis controls for age, race, education, income, religious attendance and region of residence. The findings report some inconsistency in regards to the current literature. Social networks and support are found to be the most constant independent predictor of subjective well-being. While the effects of being divorced and separated, as well as cohort membership, are not as consistent, the findings are notable and should be addressed in future research addressing subjective well-being.
Title: THE 1980'S AND TODAY;AN ANALYSIS OF WOMEN'S SUBJECTIVE WELL-BEING.
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Name(s): Coleman, Michelle, Author
Gay, David, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2006
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this study is to augment the existing literature concerning the relationship between marital status, gender, social networks, and cohort effect on dimensions of subjective well-being for women. Multiple dimensions of subjective well-being are examined. Multiple regression and logistic regression are employed to examine the effects of marital status, social networks, and cohort effects on the dependent variables that tap the dimensions of subjective well-being. The analysis controls for age, race, education, income, religious attendance and region of residence. The findings report some inconsistency in regards to the current literature. Social networks and support are found to be the most constant independent predictor of subjective well-being. While the effects of being divorced and separated, as well as cohort membership, are not as consistent, the findings are notable and should be addressed in future research addressing subjective well-being.
Identifier: CFE0001230 (IID), ucf:46895 (fedora)
Note(s): 2006-08-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Subjective Well-Being
Social Networks
Marital Status
Gender
Cohort
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0001230
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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