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10X THE TALENT = 1/3 OF THE CREDIT: HOW FEMALE MUSICIANS ARE TREATED DIFFERENTLY IN MUSIC

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Date Issued:
2006
Abstract/Description:
This is an exploratory, qualitative study of female musicians and their experiences with discrimination in the music industry. Using semi-structured interviews, I analyze the experiences of nine women, ages 21 to 56, who are working as professional musicians, or who have worked professionally in the past. I ask them how they are treated differently based on their gender. Three forms of subtle discrimination are inferred from their narrative histories. First, female musicians are mistaken for non-musicians. They are encapsulated into inferior roles, like "the gimmick," "good for a girl," and "invisible accessory." Second, band mates and band managers control women's space, success, and artistic freedom. Third, their femininity, sexuality, and age are highly scrutinized. The analysis implies that female musicians are tokenized, devalued, and considered inappropriate for their jobs. Particular attention is paid to the similarities between female musicians and women in male dominated work places. I conclude by discussing the larger implications for gender, music, and social change in a sexist, unregulated industry.
Title: 10X THE TALENT = 1/3 OF THE CREDIT: HOW FEMALE MUSICIANS ARE TREATED DIFFERENTLY IN MUSIC.
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21 downloads
Name(s): Jordan, Meggan, Author
Jasinski, Jana, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2006
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This is an exploratory, qualitative study of female musicians and their experiences with discrimination in the music industry. Using semi-structured interviews, I analyze the experiences of nine women, ages 21 to 56, who are working as professional musicians, or who have worked professionally in the past. I ask them how they are treated differently based on their gender. Three forms of subtle discrimination are inferred from their narrative histories. First, female musicians are mistaken for non-musicians. They are encapsulated into inferior roles, like "the gimmick," "good for a girl," and "invisible accessory." Second, band mates and band managers control women's space, success, and artistic freedom. Third, their femininity, sexuality, and age are highly scrutinized. The analysis implies that female musicians are tokenized, devalued, and considered inappropriate for their jobs. Particular attention is paid to the similarities between female musicians and women in male dominated work places. I conclude by discussing the larger implications for gender, music, and social change in a sexist, unregulated industry.
Identifier: CFE0001251 (IID), ucf:46901 (fedora)
Note(s): 2006-08-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): female
musician
music
sociology
qualitative
body
control
roles
kanter
tokenism
token
singers
song writers
instruments
women
inequailty
discrimination
working harder
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0001251
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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