You are here

A HOLISTIC USABILITY FRAMEWORK FOR DISTRIBUTED SIMULATION SYSTEMS

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2006
Abstract/Description:
This dissertation develops a holistic usability framework for distributed simulation systems (DSSs). The framework is developed considering relevant research in human-computer interaction, computer science, technical writing, engineering, management, and psychology. The methodology used consists of three steps: (1) framework development, (2) surveys of users to validate and refine the framework, and to determine attribute weights, and (3) application of the framework to two real-world systems. The concept of a holistic usability framework for DSSs arose during a project to improve the usability of the Virtual Test Bed, a prototypical DSS, and the framework is partly a result of that project. In addition, DSSs at Ames Research Center were studied for additional insights. The framework has six dimensions: end user needs, end user interface(s), programming, installation, training, and documentation. The categories of participants in this study include managers, researchers, programmers, end users, trainers, and trainees. The first survey was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative data to validate and refine the framework. Attributes that failed the validation test were dropped from the framework. A second survey was used to obtain attribute weights. The refined framework was used to evaluate two existing DSSs, measuring their holistic usabilities. Ensuring that the needs of the variety of types of users who interact with the system during design, development, and use are met is important to launch a successful system. Adequate consideration of system usability along the several dimensions in the framework will not only ensure system success but also increase productivity, lower life cycle costs, and result in a more pleasurable working experience for people who work with the system.
Title: A HOLISTIC USABILITY FRAMEWORK FOR DISTRIBUTED SIMULATION SYSTEMS.
25 views
14 downloads
Name(s): Dawson, Jeffrey, Author
Rabelo, Luis, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2006
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This dissertation develops a holistic usability framework for distributed simulation systems (DSSs). The framework is developed considering relevant research in human-computer interaction, computer science, technical writing, engineering, management, and psychology. The methodology used consists of three steps: (1) framework development, (2) surveys of users to validate and refine the framework, and to determine attribute weights, and (3) application of the framework to two real-world systems. The concept of a holistic usability framework for DSSs arose during a project to improve the usability of the Virtual Test Bed, a prototypical DSS, and the framework is partly a result of that project. In addition, DSSs at Ames Research Center were studied for additional insights. The framework has six dimensions: end user needs, end user interface(s), programming, installation, training, and documentation. The categories of participants in this study include managers, researchers, programmers, end users, trainers, and trainees. The first survey was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative data to validate and refine the framework. Attributes that failed the validation test were dropped from the framework. A second survey was used to obtain attribute weights. The refined framework was used to evaluate two existing DSSs, measuring their holistic usabilities. Ensuring that the needs of the variety of types of users who interact with the system during design, development, and use are met is important to launch a successful system. Adequate consideration of system usability along the several dimensions in the framework will not only ensure system success but also increase productivity, lower life cycle costs, and result in a more pleasurable working experience for people who work with the system.
Identifier: CFE0001256 (IID), ucf:46906 (fedora)
Note(s): 2006-08-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Industrial Engineering and Management Systems
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): usability
simulation
distributed simulation
human engineering
framework
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0001256
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections