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THE TAÍNO ARE STILL ALIVE, TAÍNO CUAN YAHABO: AN EXAMPLE OF THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF RACE AND ETHNICITY

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Date Issued:
2006
Abstract/Description:
Definitions and boundaries of race and ethnicity are socially constructed. They are malleable inventions created by the negotiation of ascribed ideas from outside groups and asserted notions from the inside group's membership. The revitalization of Taíno identity and culture within the Puerto Rican and related communities is a classic case example of this negotiation. Although objective conditions exist to recognize the descendants of these Caribbean aboriginals as an identifiable group, their identities are contested and sometimes ridiculed. Even though Taíno heritage is accepted as an essential root of Puerto Rico's cultural and biological make-up, this group has been classified as extinct since the early 16th century. This thesis analyzes the official newsletters of the Taíno Nation of the Antilles--one of the leading organizations working for revitalization. The content of this material culture was dissected and organized into rhetorical categories in order to reveal patterns of endogamic assertions of race and ethnicity. This thesis will provide a descriptive analysis of the Taíno Nation's rhetorical process of convincing the world that they do in fact exist.
Title: THE TAÍNO ARE STILL ALIVE, TAÍNO CUAN YAHABO: AN EXAMPLE OF THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF RACE AND ETHNICITY.
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Name(s): Cintron, David, Author
Corzine, Jay, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2006
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Definitions and boundaries of race and ethnicity are socially constructed. They are malleable inventions created by the negotiation of ascribed ideas from outside groups and asserted notions from the inside group's membership. The revitalization of Taíno identity and culture within the Puerto Rican and related communities is a classic case example of this negotiation. Although objective conditions exist to recognize the descendants of these Caribbean aboriginals as an identifiable group, their identities are contested and sometimes ridiculed. Even though Taíno heritage is accepted as an essential root of Puerto Rico's cultural and biological make-up, this group has been classified as extinct since the early 16th century. This thesis analyzes the official newsletters of the Taíno Nation of the Antilles--one of the leading organizations working for revitalization. The content of this material culture was dissected and organized into rhetorical categories in order to reveal patterns of endogamic assertions of race and ethnicity. This thesis will provide a descriptive analysis of the Taíno Nation's rhetorical process of convincing the world that they do in fact exist.
Identifier: CFE0001325 (IID), ucf:46988 (fedora)
Note(s): 2006-08-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Taino
Arawak
American Indians
Caribbean Indians
Native Americans
Caribbean Natives
The Taino Nation of the Antilles
social constructionism
race
ethnicity
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0001325
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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