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MINORITY PHYSICIAN JOB SATISFACTION: A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF WRITTEN RESPONSES TO OPEN-ENDED SURVEY QUESTIONS ABOUT PROFESSIONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL DISSATISFACTION

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Date Issued:
2006
Abstract/Description:
Few interpersonal and organizational communication studies examine the professional and organizational aspects of career satisfaction among minority physicians. Due to the underrepresenation of minority physicians, most studies resort to comparing aggregate groups of minority physicians in juxtaposition to non-minority physicians. These studies fail to uncover possible communication differences, which originate from cultural dissimilarities between disaggregate racial/ethnic groups. Even fewer studies examine physicians' written communication to open-ended survey questions about career satisfaction/dissatisfaction between disaggregate racial/ethnic minority groups and non-minorities. This study specifically examines written responses to two open-ended survey questions about professional and organizational dissatisfaction and compares responses from disaggregate minority physician and non-minority physicians. Participants were divided into five response-driven categories of race/ethnicity as follows: Asian/Pacific Islander, Black/African American, Indian/Pakistani, Hispanic, and White/Non-Hispanic. The population consists of 1849 members of the medical staff roster of a Southeastern, U.S., not-for-profit hospital group. Primary findings indicate the presence of recurrent themes among disaggregate minority physician racial/ethnic groups' responses. Significant variation exists between responses from disaggregate minority physician racial/ethnic groups and non-minority physicians. Results imply that open-ended methods of data collection are essential to gaining knowledge about ways cultural dissimilarities between disaggregate minority racial/ethnic groups affect communication and satisfaction. Understanding more about cultural dissimilarities is necessary for: improving data collection quality; recruiting and retaining minority physicians; and reducing healthcare disparities among minorities.
Title: MINORITY PHYSICIAN JOB SATISFACTION: A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF WRITTEN RESPONSES TO OPEN-ENDED SURVEY QUESTIONS ABOUT PROFESSIONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL DISSATISFACTION.
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Name(s): Daniels-Kranz, Devorah, Author
Barfield, Rufus, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2006
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Few interpersonal and organizational communication studies examine the professional and organizational aspects of career satisfaction among minority physicians. Due to the underrepresenation of minority physicians, most studies resort to comparing aggregate groups of minority physicians in juxtaposition to non-minority physicians. These studies fail to uncover possible communication differences, which originate from cultural dissimilarities between disaggregate racial/ethnic groups. Even fewer studies examine physicians' written communication to open-ended survey questions about career satisfaction/dissatisfaction between disaggregate racial/ethnic minority groups and non-minorities. This study specifically examines written responses to two open-ended survey questions about professional and organizational dissatisfaction and compares responses from disaggregate minority physician and non-minority physicians. Participants were divided into five response-driven categories of race/ethnicity as follows: Asian/Pacific Islander, Black/African American, Indian/Pakistani, Hispanic, and White/Non-Hispanic. The population consists of 1849 members of the medical staff roster of a Southeastern, U.S., not-for-profit hospital group. Primary findings indicate the presence of recurrent themes among disaggregate minority physician racial/ethnic groups' responses. Significant variation exists between responses from disaggregate minority physician racial/ethnic groups and non-minority physicians. Results imply that open-ended methods of data collection are essential to gaining knowledge about ways cultural dissimilarities between disaggregate minority racial/ethnic groups affect communication and satisfaction. Understanding more about cultural dissimilarities is necessary for: improving data collection quality; recruiting and retaining minority physicians; and reducing healthcare disparities among minorities.
Identifier: CFE0001488 (IID), ucf:47090 (fedora)
Note(s): 2006-12-01
M.A.
Sciences, Nicholson School of Communication
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): minority physician communication
physician communication
minority physician satisfaction
physician satisfaction
healthcare communication
minority communication
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0001488
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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