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PHYSICALLY-BASED VISUALIZATION OF RESIDENTIAL BUILDING DAMAGE PROCESS IN HURRICANE

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Date Issued:
2007
Abstract/Description:
This research provides realistic techniques to visualize the process of damage to residential building caused by hurricane force winds. Three methods are implemented to make the visualization useful for educating the public about mitigation measures for their homes. First, the underline physics uses Quick Collision Response Calculation. This is an iterative method, which can tune the accuracy and the performance to calculate collision response between building components. Secondly, the damage process is designed as a Time-scalable Process. By attaching a damage time tag for each building component, the visualization process is treated as a geometry animation allowing users to navigate in the visualization. The detached building components move in response to the wind force that is calculated using qualitative rather than quantitative techniques. The results are acceptable for instructional systems but not for engineering analysis. Quick Damage Prediction is achieved by using a database query instead of using a Monte-Carlo simulation. The database is based on HAZUS® engineering analysis data which gives it validity. A reasoning mechanism based on the definition of the overall building damage in HAZUS® is used to determine the damage state of selected building components including roof cover, roof sheathing, wall, openings and roof-wall connections. Exposure settings of environmental aspects of the simulated environment, such as ocean, trees, cloud and rain are integrated into a scene-graph based graphics engine. Based on the graphics engine and the physics engine, a procedural modeling method is used to efficiently render residential buildings. The resulting program, Hurricane!, is an instructional program for public education useful in schools and museum exhibits.
Title: PHYSICALLY-BASED VISUALIZATION OF RESIDENTIAL BUILDING DAMAGE PROCESS IN HURRICANE.
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Name(s): Liao, Dezhi, Author
Kincaid, J. Peter, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2007
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This research provides realistic techniques to visualize the process of damage to residential building caused by hurricane force winds. Three methods are implemented to make the visualization useful for educating the public about mitigation measures for their homes. First, the underline physics uses Quick Collision Response Calculation. This is an iterative method, which can tune the accuracy and the performance to calculate collision response between building components. Secondly, the damage process is designed as a Time-scalable Process. By attaching a damage time tag for each building component, the visualization process is treated as a geometry animation allowing users to navigate in the visualization. The detached building components move in response to the wind force that is calculated using qualitative rather than quantitative techniques. The results are acceptable for instructional systems but not for engineering analysis. Quick Damage Prediction is achieved by using a database query instead of using a Monte-Carlo simulation. The database is based on HAZUS® engineering analysis data which gives it validity. A reasoning mechanism based on the definition of the overall building damage in HAZUS® is used to determine the damage state of selected building components including roof cover, roof sheathing, wall, openings and roof-wall connections. Exposure settings of environmental aspects of the simulated environment, such as ocean, trees, cloud and rain are integrated into a scene-graph based graphics engine. Based on the graphics engine and the physics engine, a procedural modeling method is used to efficiently render residential buildings. The resulting program, Hurricane!, is an instructional program for public education useful in schools and museum exhibits.
Identifier: CFE0001609 (IID), ucf:47190 (fedora)
Note(s): 2007-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Other
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): computer graphics
visualization
hurricane damage
rigid body simulation
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0001609
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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