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ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY IN THE GLOBAL CAPITALIST SYSTEM: A WORLD-SYSTEMS APPROACH AND STUDY OF PANAMA

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Date Issued:
2007
Abstract/Description:
The current global capitalist system is at odds with environmental protection and the protection of indigenous people that are directly linked to the land on which they live. In environmental security literature, many have argued that, theoretically and functionally, it is possible to link national security with environmental security. However possible this may be on paper, in practice, the global capitalist system prevents this from becoming a reality. Using a world-systems approach, this thesis will show that core countries seeking to expand capital by tapping into new markets, locating new sources of raw materials and even forming strategic military partnerships in periphery countries unavoidably degrade the natural environment and thus, adversely affect the lives and health of indigenous people. It is also the argument in this paper that the primary purpose of strategic military partnerships with periphery states, such as those formed in Panama and Colombia, are primarily meant to protect economic interests, thus perpetuating the capitalist cycle. The end result is that, while it is theoretically possible, through a different theoretical lens, to bridge the definitional and theoretical gulf between national security and environmental security, the reality of the system subverts this endeavor, and will continue to do so under its current configuration.
Title: ENVIRONMENTAL SECURITY IN THE GLOBAL CAPITALIST SYSTEM: A WORLD-SYSTEMS APPROACH AND STUDY OF PANAMA.
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Name(s): Freeman, Mark, Author
Jacques, Peter, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2007
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The current global capitalist system is at odds with environmental protection and the protection of indigenous people that are directly linked to the land on which they live. In environmental security literature, many have argued that, theoretically and functionally, it is possible to link national security with environmental security. However possible this may be on paper, in practice, the global capitalist system prevents this from becoming a reality. Using a world-systems approach, this thesis will show that core countries seeking to expand capital by tapping into new markets, locating new sources of raw materials and even forming strategic military partnerships in periphery countries unavoidably degrade the natural environment and thus, adversely affect the lives and health of indigenous people. It is also the argument in this paper that the primary purpose of strategic military partnerships with periphery states, such as those formed in Panama and Colombia, are primarily meant to protect economic interests, thus perpetuating the capitalist cycle. The end result is that, while it is theoretically possible, through a different theoretical lens, to bridge the definitional and theoretical gulf between national security and environmental security, the reality of the system subverts this endeavor, and will continue to do so under its current configuration.
Identifier: CFE0001981 (IID), ucf:47425 (fedora)
Note(s): 2007-12-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Political Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Environmental politics
policy
security
indigenous
world-system
Panama
environmental security
capitalism
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0001981
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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