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SELF-ASSEMBLED LIPID TUBULES: STRUCTURES, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, AND APPLICATIONS.

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Date Issued:
2007
Abstract/Description:
Self-assembled lipid tubules are particularly attractive for inorganic synthesis and drug delivery because they have hollow cylindrical shapes and relatively rigid mechanical properties. In this thesis work, we have synthesized lipid tubules of 1,2-bis(tricosa-10,12-dinoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC) by self-assembly and polymerization in solutions. We demonstrate for the first time that both uniform and modulated molecular tilt orderings exist in the tubule walls, which have been predicted by current theories, and therefore provide valuable supporting evidences for self-assembly mechanisms of chiral molecules. Two novel methods are developed for studying the axial and radial deformations of DC8,9PC lipid tubules. Mechanical properties of DC8,9PC tubules are systematically studied in terms of persistence length, bending rigidity, strain energy, axial and radial elastic moduli, and critical force for collapse. Mechanisms of recovery and surface stiffening are discussed. Due to the high aspect ratio of lipid tubules, the hierarchical assembly of lipid tubules into ordered arrays and desired architectures is critical in developing their applications. Two efficient methods for fabricating ordered arrays of lipid tubules on solid substrates have been developed. Ordered arrays of hybrid silica-lipid tubes are synthesized by tubule array-templated sol-gel reactions. Ordered arrays of optical anisotropic fibers with tunable shapes and refractive indexes are fabricated. This thesis work provides a paradigm for molecularly engineered structures.
Title: SELF-ASSEMBLED LIPID TUBULES: STRUCTURES, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, AND APPLICATIONS.
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Name(s): Zhao, Yue, Author
Fang, Jiyu, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2007
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Self-assembled lipid tubules are particularly attractive for inorganic synthesis and drug delivery because they have hollow cylindrical shapes and relatively rigid mechanical properties. In this thesis work, we have synthesized lipid tubules of 1,2-bis(tricosa-10,12-dinoyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC) by self-assembly and polymerization in solutions. We demonstrate for the first time that both uniform and modulated molecular tilt orderings exist in the tubule walls, which have been predicted by current theories, and therefore provide valuable supporting evidences for self-assembly mechanisms of chiral molecules. Two novel methods are developed for studying the axial and radial deformations of DC8,9PC lipid tubules. Mechanical properties of DC8,9PC tubules are systematically studied in terms of persistence length, bending rigidity, strain energy, axial and radial elastic moduli, and critical force for collapse. Mechanisms of recovery and surface stiffening are discussed. Due to the high aspect ratio of lipid tubules, the hierarchical assembly of lipid tubules into ordered arrays and desired architectures is critical in developing their applications. Two efficient methods for fabricating ordered arrays of lipid tubules on solid substrates have been developed. Ordered arrays of hybrid silica-lipid tubes are synthesized by tubule array-templated sol-gel reactions. Ordered arrays of optical anisotropic fibers with tunable shapes and refractive indexes are fabricated. This thesis work provides a paradigm for molecularly engineered structures.
Identifier: CFE0001918 (IID), ucf:47486 (fedora)
Note(s): 2007-12-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): self-assembly
supramolecular structure
atomic force microscopy
liquid crystal imaging
finite element modeling
soft-lithography
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0001918
Restrictions on Access: campus 2008-12-04
Host Institution: UCF

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