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BROTHERS & SISTERS: A NEW IMPETUS FOR SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION AND ITS IMPACT ON TRADITIONAL CULTIVATION ANALYSIS

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
Scholars recognize television's ability to influence culture. According to Gerbner, television creates socially constructed realities through the cultivation of its viewers. Television is designed to satisfy the diverse needs of large audiences. The mainstream messages conveyed via television have power to alter perceptions and change culture. Gerbner's theory was constructed from the analysis of crime dramas with single plot lines. Using the ABC television program Brothers & Sisters, this thesis explores the theoretical implications dramas with multiple plot lines have on traditional notions of cultivation theory. Through a content analysis and focus groups, evidence was acquired to suggest that cultivation theory, with the added consideration of involvement, is still able to explain television's influence on the social creation of reality.
Title: BROTHERS & SISTERS: A NEW IMPETUS FOR SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION AND ITS IMPACT ON TRADITIONAL CULTIVATION ANALYSIS .
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Name(s): Elmore, Scott, Author
Kenney, Richard, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Scholars recognize television's ability to influence culture. According to Gerbner, television creates socially constructed realities through the cultivation of its viewers. Television is designed to satisfy the diverse needs of large audiences. The mainstream messages conveyed via television have power to alter perceptions and change culture. Gerbner's theory was constructed from the analysis of crime dramas with single plot lines. Using the ABC television program Brothers & Sisters, this thesis explores the theoretical implications dramas with multiple plot lines have on traditional notions of cultivation theory. Through a content analysis and focus groups, evidence was acquired to suggest that cultivation theory, with the added consideration of involvement, is still able to explain television's influence on the social creation of reality.
Identifier: CFE0002137 (IID), ucf:47506 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-05-01
M.A.
Sciences, Nicholson School of Communication
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Cultivation Theory
Communication
Social Construction
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002137
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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