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AM I TOO FAT TO BE A PRINCESS? EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF POPULAR CHILDREN'S MEDIA ON PRESCHOOLERS' BODY IMAGE

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
The current study investigated the effects of brief exposure to appearance-related media on female preschoolers' body image. Results indicated that exposure did not affect body dissatisfaction or engagement in appearance-related play behaviors. Surprisingly, participants' self-reported frequency of weight concerns decreased at posttest. In contrast to older populations, it is possible that young children may adopt the persona of attractive characters with whom they identify rather than comparing themselves to the characters. This level of identification temporarily may alleviate weight concerns. This is the first empirical study to provide support for previous findings that suggest media exposure does not affect body image in young children. Also presented are data regarding familial influences and other media consumption (e.g., television viewing) on girls' body dissatisfaction.
Title: AM I TOO FAT TO BE A PRINCESS? EXAMINING THE EFFECTS OF POPULAR CHILDREN'S MEDIA ON PRESCHOOLERS' BODY IMAGE.
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Name(s): Hayes, Sharon, Author
Dunn, Stacey, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The current study investigated the effects of brief exposure to appearance-related media on female preschoolers' body image. Results indicated that exposure did not affect body dissatisfaction or engagement in appearance-related play behaviors. Surprisingly, participants' self-reported frequency of weight concerns decreased at posttest. In contrast to older populations, it is possible that young children may adopt the persona of attractive characters with whom they identify rather than comparing themselves to the characters. This level of identification temporarily may alleviate weight concerns. This is the first empirical study to provide support for previous findings that suggest media exposure does not affect body image in young children. Also presented are data regarding familial influences and other media consumption (e.g., television viewing) on girls' body dissatisfaction.
Identifier: CFE0002039 (IID), ucf:47588 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-05-01
M.S.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): body image
children
media
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002039
Restrictions on Access: campus 2009-04-01
Host Institution: UCF

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