You are here

CROSS-MODAL EFFECTS IN TACTILE AND VISUAL SIGNALING

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
Using a wearable tactile display three experiments were conducted in which tactile messages were created emulating five standard US Army and Marine arm and hand signals for the military commands, namely: "Attention", "Halt", "Rally", "Move Out", and "Nuclear Biological or Chemical event (NBC)". Response times and accuracy rates were collected for novices responding to visual and tactile representations of these messages, which were displayed either alone or together in congruent or incongruent combinations. Results indicated synergistic effects for concurrent, congruent message presentations showing superior response times when compared to individual presentations in either modality alone. This effect was mediated by participant strategy. Accuracy similarly improved when both the tactile and visual presentation were concurrently displayed as opposed to separately. In a low workload condition, participants could largely attend to a particular modality, with little interference from competing signals. If participants were not given instructions as to which modality to attend to, participants chose that modality which was received first. Lastly, initial learning and subsequent training of intuitive tactile signals occurred rapidly with large gains in performance in short training periods. These results confirm the promise for tactile messages to augment visual messaging in challenging and stressful environments particularly when visual messaging is maybe preferred but is not always feasible or possible.
Title: CROSS-MODAL EFFECTS IN TACTILE AND VISUAL SIGNALING.
17 views
9 downloads
Name(s): Merlo, James, Author
Hancock, Peter, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Using a wearable tactile display three experiments were conducted in which tactile messages were created emulating five standard US Army and Marine arm and hand signals for the military commands, namely: "Attention", "Halt", "Rally", "Move Out", and "Nuclear Biological or Chemical event (NBC)". Response times and accuracy rates were collected for novices responding to visual and tactile representations of these messages, which were displayed either alone or together in congruent or incongruent combinations. Results indicated synergistic effects for concurrent, congruent message presentations showing superior response times when compared to individual presentations in either modality alone. This effect was mediated by participant strategy. Accuracy similarly improved when both the tactile and visual presentation were concurrently displayed as opposed to separately. In a low workload condition, participants could largely attend to a particular modality, with little interference from competing signals. If participants were not given instructions as to which modality to attend to, participants chose that modality which was received first. Lastly, initial learning and subsequent training of intuitive tactile signals occurred rapidly with large gains in performance in short training periods. These results confirm the promise for tactile messages to augment visual messaging in challenging and stressful environments particularly when visual messaging is maybe preferred but is not always feasible or possible.
Identifier: CFE0002035 (IID), ucf:47598 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): tactile displays
tactile signaling
congruency benefits
visual signaling
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002035
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections