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INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF TACTILE STRESS ON A MILITARY TOUNIQUET APPLICATION TASK

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
In combat, soldiers encounter stress from multiple sources including loss of sleep, extremely high levels of physical and psychological discomfort, extended periods of increased vigilance, and intense danger. Therefore, it is imperative to train such personnel on how to cope with these stressors. One way to do this is to include stressors in different forms of training to acclimate soldiers to the subsequent stress of combat. Due to their advantages, tactile trainers are being investigated increasingly for the use of training Army medics in this context. The present work examines how vibrating tactile sensors, or tactors, can be used as surrogate sources of stress on an operator performing a simulated medical task. This work also examines how this "optimal" configuration interacts with other types of stress, such as noise and time pressure. The outcome findings support the hypotheses that configurations placed on sensitive body areas are more stressful than those placed on more benign body locations in terms of worse task performance on a tourniquet application task. In terms of application times, the same trends persist in terms of proper application, subjective stress and subjective workload, as well as a secondary monitoring task, in terms of response times, accuracy, and time estimation. Additionally, findings supported hypotheses that the stress responses experienced order tactile stress alone is compounded when other types of stress are employed, both on the primary and secondary tasks. These results have implications for training, such that if stressors are employed in training, performance decrements might be lessened during actual task performance; they can be generalized to not only combat medics, but other military specialties and civilian jobs that incur vibration, auditory stress, and time pressure while engaged in performance.
Title: INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF TACTILE STRESS ON A MILITARY TOUNIQUET APPLICATION TASK.
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Name(s): Nayeem, Razia, Author
Hancock, Peter , Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: In combat, soldiers encounter stress from multiple sources including loss of sleep, extremely high levels of physical and psychological discomfort, extended periods of increased vigilance, and intense danger. Therefore, it is imperative to train such personnel on how to cope with these stressors. One way to do this is to include stressors in different forms of training to acclimate soldiers to the subsequent stress of combat. Due to their advantages, tactile trainers are being investigated increasingly for the use of training Army medics in this context. The present work examines how vibrating tactile sensors, or tactors, can be used as surrogate sources of stress on an operator performing a simulated medical task. This work also examines how this "optimal" configuration interacts with other types of stress, such as noise and time pressure. The outcome findings support the hypotheses that configurations placed on sensitive body areas are more stressful than those placed on more benign body locations in terms of worse task performance on a tourniquet application task. In terms of application times, the same trends persist in terms of proper application, subjective stress and subjective workload, as well as a secondary monitoring task, in terms of response times, accuracy, and time estimation. Additionally, findings supported hypotheses that the stress responses experienced order tactile stress alone is compounded when other types of stress are employed, both on the primary and secondary tasks. These results have implications for training, such that if stressors are employed in training, performance decrements might be lessened during actual task performance; they can be generalized to not only combat medics, but other military specialties and civilian jobs that incur vibration, auditory stress, and time pressure while engaged in performance.
Identifier: CFE0002028 (IID), ucf:47612 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Tactile
Stress
Military
Training
Tourniquet
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002028
Restrictions on Access: campus 2009-03-01
Host Institution: UCF

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