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MOTORCYCLE CONSPICUITY: THE EFFECTS OF AGE AND VEHICULAR DAYTIME RUNNING LIGHTS

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
Research has shown that riding a motorcycle can potentially be much more dangerous than operating a conventional vehicle. There are factors inherent in driving or riding a small two wheeled vehicle, such as a motorcycle, moped or even bicycle that can potentially decrease their ability to be seen or noticed by other drivers. This disadvantage is reflected in the disproportionate over-representation of injuries and/or fatalities incurred by this particular driving group. This creates a significant problem which deserves dedicated evaluation as to causative factors and/or influential variables. The following research was conducted with intentions to investigate the topic of motorcycle conspicuity so as to further explain the variables which positively contribute to a motorcycle being seen and to supplement the body of knowledge that currently exists on this topic. This study specifically evaluated the influence of sex, age, motorcycle lighting conditions, and vehicular daytime running lights upon one's ability to effectively detect a motorcycle within a "high fidelity" simulated environment. This research additionally sought to examine the feasibility and validity of using a novel fixed base "high fidelity" simulator for the evaluation of motorcycle conspicuity. The results from this research clearly indicate a link between vehicular DRLs and the effective detection of motorcycles and also support previous research as to the effectiveness of motorcycle DRLs. Additionally, these results suggest that as one ages, certain degradations in vision, cognition, and physiology occur which decrease one's performance in detecting and responding to a motorcycle. These findings additionally provide support for the use of a "high definition" fixed base simulator as a valid technology for the evaluation of motorcycle conspicuity.
Title: MOTORCYCLE CONSPICUITY: THE EFFECTS OF AGE AND VEHICULAR DAYTIME RUNNING LIGHTS.
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Name(s): Torrez, Lorenzo, Author
Smither, Janan , Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Research has shown that riding a motorcycle can potentially be much more dangerous than operating a conventional vehicle. There are factors inherent in driving or riding a small two wheeled vehicle, such as a motorcycle, moped or even bicycle that can potentially decrease their ability to be seen or noticed by other drivers. This disadvantage is reflected in the disproportionate over-representation of injuries and/or fatalities incurred by this particular driving group. This creates a significant problem which deserves dedicated evaluation as to causative factors and/or influential variables. The following research was conducted with intentions to investigate the topic of motorcycle conspicuity so as to further explain the variables which positively contribute to a motorcycle being seen and to supplement the body of knowledge that currently exists on this topic. This study specifically evaluated the influence of sex, age, motorcycle lighting conditions, and vehicular daytime running lights upon one's ability to effectively detect a motorcycle within a "high fidelity" simulated environment. This research additionally sought to examine the feasibility and validity of using a novel fixed base "high fidelity" simulator for the evaluation of motorcycle conspicuity. The results from this research clearly indicate a link between vehicular DRLs and the effective detection of motorcycles and also support previous research as to the effectiveness of motorcycle DRLs. Additionally, these results suggest that as one ages, certain degradations in vision, cognition, and physiology occur which decrease one's performance in detecting and responding to a motorcycle. These findings additionally provide support for the use of a "high definition" fixed base simulator as a valid technology for the evaluation of motorcycle conspicuity.
Identifier: CFE0002016 (IID), ucf:47614 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Motorcycle Conspicuity
Motorcycle Safety
Older Adult Driver
Vehicular Daytime Running Lights
Running Lights
Headlight Modulator
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002016
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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