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PERCEPTIONS OF RISK AND NEED IN THE CLASSIFICATION AND SUPERVISION OF OFFENDERS IN THE COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS SETTING: THE ROLE OF GENDER

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
Risk has emerged as a defining feature of punishment in the United States. Feeley and Simon (1992) note that contemporary punishment is increasingly moving away from rehabilitation (the old penology) and moving toward the management and control of offenders (the new penology), often though actuarial techniques. While the profusion of risk assessment instruments, now entering their fourth generation, provides some support for the assertion that risk is indeed an important element in corrections, it was previously unknown if the risk model applied to all offenders, particularly female offenders. This dissertation addressed that gap by examining whether the risk model applied to female offenders in the community corrections setting. This dissertation surveyed 93 community corrections officers employed by the Orange County Community Corrections Department. The findings suggest that the department has incorporated many elements of the new penology into the classification and supervision of offenders in each of its units, though several gender differences were noted. Classification overrides, the perceived level of risk to the community, supervision decisions, and the perceived importance of risk and need factors were all examined in this study. The results indicate that some elements of classification and supervision function uniformly for offenders and operate irrespective of gender, but some areas, such as the perceived level of risk to the community and the perceived importance of risk factors, are influenced by gender.
Title: PERCEPTIONS OF RISK AND NEED IN THE CLASSIFICATION AND SUPERVISION OF OFFENDERS IN THE COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS SETTING: THE ROLE OF GENDER.
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Name(s): Gould, Laurie, Author
Paoline, Eugene, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Risk has emerged as a defining feature of punishment in the United States. Feeley and Simon (1992) note that contemporary punishment is increasingly moving away from rehabilitation (the old penology) and moving toward the management and control of offenders (the new penology), often though actuarial techniques. While the profusion of risk assessment instruments, now entering their fourth generation, provides some support for the assertion that risk is indeed an important element in corrections, it was previously unknown if the risk model applied to all offenders, particularly female offenders. This dissertation addressed that gap by examining whether the risk model applied to female offenders in the community corrections setting. This dissertation surveyed 93 community corrections officers employed by the Orange County Community Corrections Department. The findings suggest that the department has incorporated many elements of the new penology into the classification and supervision of offenders in each of its units, though several gender differences were noted. Classification overrides, the perceived level of risk to the community, supervision decisions, and the perceived importance of risk and need factors were all examined in this study. The results indicate that some elements of classification and supervision function uniformly for offenders and operate irrespective of gender, but some areas, such as the perceived level of risk to the community and the perceived importance of risk factors, are influenced by gender.
Identifier: CFE0002008 (IID), ucf:47623 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-05-01
Ph.D.
Health and Public Affairs, Other
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): risk assessment
gender
community corrections
new penology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002008
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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