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THE EFFECTS OF FOREIGN AID ON PERCEPTIONS OF CORRUPTION IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
This paper is a study of the effects of foreign aid on perceptions of political corruption in Sub-Saharan Africa. In keeping with the consensus on foreign aid effectiveness, this study proposed that Sub-Saharan African countries receiving more foreign aid would be more likely to maintain high levels of perceived corruption. Hypotheses were tested using multivariate regression, controlling for a number of factors which have shown to be influential on perceptions of political corruption. Two models were tested, one to show the regression over a period of nine years, and the other to show the relationship between the foreign aid and perceptions of corruption over one year. The tests resulted in showing a significantly negative relationship over nine years, but foreign aid lost its significance with perceptions of political corruption over one year. The most influential variable on political corruption in both models was the level of political rights in a country, which indicated a significantly negative relationship between the two variables. The paper also looked at Nigeria in a case study focusing on the effects of foreign aid on governance and economic policy environments, corruption being a major factor in both of these. This study resulted in the conclusion that increases in foreign aid paralleled improved perceptions of political corruption, and that Nigeria's reform initiative during the Obasanjo regime (1999-2007) was the major determining factor in this perception shift. Overall, this study supports the consensus that foreign aid given to countries with reform-minded governments is more likely to contribute to the fight against corruption.
Title: THE EFFECTS OF FOREIGN AID ON PERCEPTIONS OF CORRUPTION IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA.
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Name(s): Wilkie, Margaret, Author
Fine, Terri, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This paper is a study of the effects of foreign aid on perceptions of political corruption in Sub-Saharan Africa. In keeping with the consensus on foreign aid effectiveness, this study proposed that Sub-Saharan African countries receiving more foreign aid would be more likely to maintain high levels of perceived corruption. Hypotheses were tested using multivariate regression, controlling for a number of factors which have shown to be influential on perceptions of political corruption. Two models were tested, one to show the regression over a period of nine years, and the other to show the relationship between the foreign aid and perceptions of corruption over one year. The tests resulted in showing a significantly negative relationship over nine years, but foreign aid lost its significance with perceptions of political corruption over one year. The most influential variable on political corruption in both models was the level of political rights in a country, which indicated a significantly negative relationship between the two variables. The paper also looked at Nigeria in a case study focusing on the effects of foreign aid on governance and economic policy environments, corruption being a major factor in both of these. This study resulted in the conclusion that increases in foreign aid paralleled improved perceptions of political corruption, and that Nigeria's reform initiative during the Obasanjo regime (1999-2007) was the major determining factor in this perception shift. Overall, this study supports the consensus that foreign aid given to countries with reform-minded governments is more likely to contribute to the fight against corruption.
Identifier: CFE0002440 (IID), ucf:47726 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-12-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Political Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): corruption
foreign aid
Sub-Saharan Africa
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002440
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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