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ADOLESCENTS' STRESS AND HEALTH: PARENTAL INFLUENCES AND COGNITIVE MEDIATORS

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
Research to date indicates that parental and cognitive variables play a role in stress responses and health outcomes. Although researchers are beginning to focus on developmental processes in stress/health outcomes, there is little research examining which parental behaviors are most predictive of stress/health and whether cognitive variables mediate this relationship. As a result, the current study examines the self-reports of 160 late adolescents regarding parental behaviors, cognitive variables, and stress/health outcomes. In addition, blood pressure reactivity to a stressful situation was collected as a physiological measure of stress. The results suggest that, among the parental behaviors that are examined, parental overprotection and poor monitoring are the most predictive variables of adolescents' stress/health. The results indicate that adolescents' cognitions also are significant predictors of their self-reported stress/health. Further, adolescents' cognitions fully mediate the relationship between paternal behaviors and stress/health outcomes and partially mediate the relationship between maternal behaviors and stress/health outcomes. Finally, measures of blood pressure reactivity are not significantly related to study variables or were related in unpredicted directions. Possible explanations for these results are discussed. Overall, future research should examine parental overprotection and poor monitoring as important distal variables in adolescents' stress/health but should examine adolescents' cognitions as a more salient and immediate predictor of adolescents' stress/health.
Title: ADOLESCENTS' STRESS AND HEALTH: PARENTAL INFLUENCES AND COGNITIVE MEDIATORS.
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Name(s): Donnelly, Reesa, Author
Renk, Kimberly, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Research to date indicates that parental and cognitive variables play a role in stress responses and health outcomes. Although researchers are beginning to focus on developmental processes in stress/health outcomes, there is little research examining which parental behaviors are most predictive of stress/health and whether cognitive variables mediate this relationship. As a result, the current study examines the self-reports of 160 late adolescents regarding parental behaviors, cognitive variables, and stress/health outcomes. In addition, blood pressure reactivity to a stressful situation was collected as a physiological measure of stress. The results suggest that, among the parental behaviors that are examined, parental overprotection and poor monitoring are the most predictive variables of adolescents' stress/health. The results indicate that adolescents' cognitions also are significant predictors of their self-reported stress/health. Further, adolescents' cognitions fully mediate the relationship between paternal behaviors and stress/health outcomes and partially mediate the relationship between maternal behaviors and stress/health outcomes. Finally, measures of blood pressure reactivity are not significantly related to study variables or were related in unpredicted directions. Possible explanations for these results are discussed. Overall, future research should examine parental overprotection and poor monitoring as important distal variables in adolescents' stress/health but should examine adolescents' cognitions as a more salient and immediate predictor of adolescents' stress/health.
Identifier: CFE0002367 (IID), ucf:47778 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-12-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): stress
health
cognitions
parent-child relationships
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002367
Restrictions on Access: campus 2013-10-01
Host Institution: UCF

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