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LIVING AND THRIVING IN THE LAND OF MILK AND HONEY: RELIGION AND THE SUCCESS OF MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS TO THE UNITED STATES

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
This study examines the role of religion in promoting the success of Mexican immigrants, as measured by typical U.S. standards of success, including income, education, assets (such as homeownership), and health, including access to health insurance, controlling for age, education, gender, and ability to speak English. These measures are analyzed against various indicators of religiosity. The hypothesis driving the research is: religiosity increases an immigrant's success in the United States. This hypothesis was informed by social capital theory, and a distinction is made between bridging and bonding forms of social capital. The results show only a very weak correlation between religion and success, as measured by the data. Also, immigrants attending churches where Spanish is spoken, and those with mainly Mexican immigrant populations are less likely to enjoy success, implying that bonding forms of social capital actually work against them.
Title: LIVING AND THRIVING IN THE LAND OF MILK AND HONEY: RELIGION AND THE SUCCESS OF MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS TO THE UNITED STATES.
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Name(s): Dodge, Jamie, Author
Wright, James, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study examines the role of religion in promoting the success of Mexican immigrants, as measured by typical U.S. standards of success, including income, education, assets (such as homeownership), and health, including access to health insurance, controlling for age, education, gender, and ability to speak English. These measures are analyzed against various indicators of religiosity. The hypothesis driving the research is: religiosity increases an immigrant's success in the United States. This hypothesis was informed by social capital theory, and a distinction is made between bridging and bonding forms of social capital. The results show only a very weak correlation between religion and success, as measured by the data. Also, immigrants attending churches where Spanish is spoken, and those with mainly Mexican immigrant populations are less likely to enjoy success, implying that bonding forms of social capital actually work against them.
Identifier: CFE0002341 (IID), ucf:47817 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-08-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Mexican
immigration
religion
social capital
Spanish
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002341
Restrictions on Access: campus 2011-08-01
Host Institution: UCF

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