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"WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR OUR ADDICTIONS, BUT WE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR OUR RECOVERY": A QUALITATIVE EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE LIFE HISTORIES OF HOMELESS ALCOHOLICS IN RECOVERY

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
This is an exploratory, qualitative study of homeless, recovering alcoholics and the problems they encounter maintaining sobriety. Using semi-structured interviews, I analyze the experiences of ten men in their forties, who are in a recovery program designed for homeless men. I ask them how they stay sober without a place to live. Three kinds of problems are inferred from their narrative histories. First, the men have difficulty identifying as alcoholics. They have trouble fully integrating into the AA program. Second, the men struggle to form relationships with others, especially with a sponsor. Third, the process of "working the steps" is adapted complexly, more than in a normal twelve-step setting. The findings indicate that homeless men face special barriers to achieving and maintaining sobriety. I conclude by discussing the larger implications for sobriety, homelessness and social change within this community.
Title: "WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR OUR ADDICTIONS, BUT WE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR OUR RECOVERY": A QUALITATIVE EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE LIFE HISTORIES OF HOMELESS ALCOHOLICS IN RECOVERY.
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Name(s): Rayburn, Rachel, Author
Wright, James, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This is an exploratory, qualitative study of homeless, recovering alcoholics and the problems they encounter maintaining sobriety. Using semi-structured interviews, I analyze the experiences of ten men in their forties, who are in a recovery program designed for homeless men. I ask them how they stay sober without a place to live. Three kinds of problems are inferred from their narrative histories. First, the men have difficulty identifying as alcoholics. They have trouble fully integrating into the AA program. Second, the men struggle to form relationships with others, especially with a sponsor. Third, the process of "working the steps" is adapted complexly, more than in a normal twelve-step setting. The findings indicate that homeless men face special barriers to achieving and maintaining sobriety. I conclude by discussing the larger implications for sobriety, homelessness and social change within this community.
Identifier: CFE0002226 (IID), ucf:47886 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-08-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Alcoholism
Homelessness
Alcoholics Anonymous
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002226
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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