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FOOD FOR THOUGHT: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THOUGHT SUPPRESSION AND WEIGHT CONTROL

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
The current study assessed the relationship between individuals' tendency to suppress thoughts, particularly related to food and body weight/shape, and outcomes such as weight loss maintenance and diet sabotaging experiences (e.g., binge eating). Community and university individuals (N = 347) who are or previously were overweight completed self-report measures of thought suppression, weight history, and eating behaviors. Suppression of specific thoughts about food/weight/shape was related to weight cycling, binge eating, and food cravings. Participants who believed thoughts of food lead to eating were more likely to attempt suppression of food-related thoughts. Results have implications for improving weight loss maintenance and support further exploration of third wave interventions, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Mindfulness, in the treatment of obesity.
Title: FOOD FOR THOUGHT: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THOUGHT SUPPRESSION AND WEIGHT CONTROL.
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Name(s): Peterson, Rachel, Author
Tantleff Dunn, Stacey, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The current study assessed the relationship between individuals' tendency to suppress thoughts, particularly related to food and body weight/shape, and outcomes such as weight loss maintenance and diet sabotaging experiences (e.g., binge eating). Community and university individuals (N = 347) who are or previously were overweight completed self-report measures of thought suppression, weight history, and eating behaviors. Suppression of specific thoughts about food/weight/shape was related to weight cycling, binge eating, and food cravings. Participants who believed thoughts of food lead to eating were more likely to attempt suppression of food-related thoughts. Results have implications for improving weight loss maintenance and support further exploration of third wave interventions, such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Mindfulness, in the treatment of obesity.
Identifier: CFE0002231 (IID), ucf:47906 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-08-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): eating behaviors
obesity
thought suppression
weight loss
maintenance
binge eating
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002231
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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