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THE IMPACT OF ORGANIZATIONAL POLITICS ON MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS

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Date Issued:
2008
Abstract/Description:
Mentoring in the workplace has become an increasingly popular trend because of its touted success at addressing the career and social related needs of employees. While the majority of the research on mentoring has examined protégé benefits, far fewer studies have examined the potential negative effects of mentoring. Moreover, little is known about the antecedents of negative mentoring experiences. A primary objective of the present study was to investigate relations between mentor and protégé perceptions of organizational politics and reports of functional and dysfunctional mentoring. In addition, I examined the joint contribution of functional and dysfunctional mentoring to a number of protégé outcomes. Data were collected from 93 mentor-protégé dyads employed across the United States by a marketing communications business. Results indicated that mentors who perceived their climate to be more political expressed greater motivation to mentor for their own self-enhancement and lesser motivation to mentor for their own intrinsic satisfaction. Protégés who perceived their climate to be more political reported a greater incidence of dysfunctional mentoring. Protégé reports of the functional mentoring they received accounted for unique variance in predicting supervisor ratings of their performance, whereas dysfunctional mentoring accounted for unique variance in predicting turnover intentions, stress, and job satisfaction. The results of this study broaden our understanding of the manner in which mentoring relationships can go awry.
Title: THE IMPACT OF ORGANIZATIONAL POLITICS ON MENTORING RELATIONSHIPS.
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Name(s): Bencaz, Nicholas, Author
Jentsch, Kimberly, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2008
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Mentoring in the workplace has become an increasingly popular trend because of its touted success at addressing the career and social related needs of employees. While the majority of the research on mentoring has examined protégé benefits, far fewer studies have examined the potential negative effects of mentoring. Moreover, little is known about the antecedents of negative mentoring experiences. A primary objective of the present study was to investigate relations between mentor and protégé perceptions of organizational politics and reports of functional and dysfunctional mentoring. In addition, I examined the joint contribution of functional and dysfunctional mentoring to a number of protégé outcomes. Data were collected from 93 mentor-protégé dyads employed across the United States by a marketing communications business. Results indicated that mentors who perceived their climate to be more political expressed greater motivation to mentor for their own self-enhancement and lesser motivation to mentor for their own intrinsic satisfaction. Protégés who perceived their climate to be more political reported a greater incidence of dysfunctional mentoring. Protégé reports of the functional mentoring they received accounted for unique variance in predicting supervisor ratings of their performance, whereas dysfunctional mentoring accounted for unique variance in predicting turnover intentions, stress, and job satisfaction. The results of this study broaden our understanding of the manner in which mentoring relationships can go awry.
Identifier: CFE0002195 (IID), ucf:47923 (fedora)
Note(s): 2008-05-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Dysfunctional mentoring
Organizational Politics
Political Skill
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002195
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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