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STRESS INTENSITY FACTOR DEPENDENCE OF HG-AL LIQUID METAL EMBRITTLEMENT

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Date Issued:
2009
Abstract/Description:
When high strength aluminum alloys are subjected to liquid metals, physical and chemical reactions ensue resulting in what is known as liquid metal embrittlement (LME). A subset of environmentally-assisted cracking, LME is exhibited when a liquid metal, e.g. Hg or Ga, comes into intimate contact with a solid metal having significant susceptibility. As mechanical loads are applied, the interaction between the two metals results in a reduction in the flow properties of the solid metal. Several theories have been proposed to identify the underlying microstructural failure mechanism; however, none have been widely accepted, as failures can typically incorporate features common to several failure theories. In an effort to confirm, extend or replace the physically-based theories, fracture mechanics experiments on Al 7075–T651 in liquid mercury have been conducted. Experiments were conducted in a custom environmental chamber capable of exposing specimens to liquid environments while applying a mechanical load. Through both plane-strain fracture and stress intensity factor-dependent (SIF) tests, fracture toughness values along with incubation periods were analyzed and provided data for a load-based theory of LME. These mechanical test data, along with metallographic analysis, show that the phenomena of LME is both strongly time- and SIF-dependent.
Title: STRESS INTENSITY FACTOR DEPENDENCE OF HG-AL LIQUID METAL EMBRITTLEMENT.
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Name(s): Keller, Scott, Author
Gordon, Ali, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2009
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: When high strength aluminum alloys are subjected to liquid metals, physical and chemical reactions ensue resulting in what is known as liquid metal embrittlement (LME). A subset of environmentally-assisted cracking, LME is exhibited when a liquid metal, e.g. Hg or Ga, comes into intimate contact with a solid metal having significant susceptibility. As mechanical loads are applied, the interaction between the two metals results in a reduction in the flow properties of the solid metal. Several theories have been proposed to identify the underlying microstructural failure mechanism; however, none have been widely accepted, as failures can typically incorporate features common to several failure theories. In an effort to confirm, extend or replace the physically-based theories, fracture mechanics experiments on Al 7075–T651 in liquid mercury have been conducted. Experiments were conducted in a custom environmental chamber capable of exposing specimens to liquid environments while applying a mechanical load. Through both plane-strain fracture and stress intensity factor-dependent (SIF) tests, fracture toughness values along with incubation periods were analyzed and provided data for a load-based theory of LME. These mechanical test data, along with metallographic analysis, show that the phenomena of LME is both strongly time- and SIF-dependent.
Identifier: CFE0002893 (IID), ucf:48033 (fedora)
Note(s): 2009-12-01
M.S.M.E.
Engineering and Computer Science, Department of Mechanical Materials and Aerospace Engineering
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Aluminum
Fracture
Stress Intensity Factor
LME
SCC
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002893
Restrictions on Access: private 2010-11-01
Host Institution: UCF

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