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THE COMMITMENT OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS TO INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

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Date Issued:
2009
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the commitment of elementary school teachers to inclusive education for students with disabilities (SWD), and whether the commitment to inclusive education between general and special education teachers was equal. Measurements were based on Richard Clarke's Commitmemt and Necessary Effort (CANE) theory, severity of disability, and demographic factors including teaching assignment, number of students in class, number of years teaching and number of years working in an inclusive setting. A four-point Likert-type survey(Appendix A) adapted from a combination of Spencer Salend's (2008) "Teacher's Inclusion Survey and Interview Question to examine the Experience of Educators Working in Inclusive Classrooms" was used to collect the data. The data indicated that 57% of the respondents were committed to inclusive education, with special education teachers displaying a greater committment than their general education counterparts. In addition some of the earlier roadblocks to inclusive education such as needed support from administrators and ancillary personnel dealing with SWD, lack of resources, time for collaboration and consulation, along with a need for more training, still appear to be pervasive problems in implementing a fully inclusive program for all students nearly two decades later in contemporary schools.
Title: THE COMMITMENT OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS TO INCLUSIVE EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES.
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Name(s): Cox, Margaret, Author
Martin, Suzanne, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2009
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the commitment of elementary school teachers to inclusive education for students with disabilities (SWD), and whether the commitment to inclusive education between general and special education teachers was equal. Measurements were based on Richard Clarke's Commitmemt and Necessary Effort (CANE) theory, severity of disability, and demographic factors including teaching assignment, number of students in class, number of years teaching and number of years working in an inclusive setting. A four-point Likert-type survey(Appendix A) adapted from a combination of Spencer Salend's (2008) "Teacher's Inclusion Survey and Interview Question to examine the Experience of Educators Working in Inclusive Classrooms" was used to collect the data. The data indicated that 57% of the respondents were committed to inclusive education, with special education teachers displaying a greater committment than their general education counterparts. In addition some of the earlier roadblocks to inclusive education such as needed support from administrators and ancillary personnel dealing with SWD, lack of resources, time for collaboration and consulation, along with a need for more training, still appear to be pervasive problems in implementing a fully inclusive program for all students nearly two decades later in contemporary schools.
Identifier: CFE0002858 (IID), ucf:48070 (fedora)
Note(s): 2009-12-01
Ed.D.
Education, Department of Educational Studies
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): inclusion
students with disabilities
elementary school teachers
commitment
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002858
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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