You are here

EVALUATION OF JUVENILE JUSTICE EDUCATION PROGRAMS: WHAT THE NUMBERS SAY ABOUT JUVENILE RECIDIVISM

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2009
Abstract/Description:
Each year more than 100,000 juveniles are incarcerated in residential rehabilitative facilities. As part of their course of treatment, educational services are mandated for these incarcerated youth. Programs serving these individuals must provide adequate and appropriate educational programs for these juveniles. With a growing public concern over juvenile delinquency and recidivism, programs are being held accountable for the effectiveness and quality of the programming they offer. In Florida, juvenile justice programs offering educational services are monitored annually by the Juvenile Justice Education Enhancement Program. These programs receive a Quality Assurance (QA) rating as determined by a review team that spends several days in the program reviewing documentation and interviewing youth and program staff. This study proposes to examine any potential relationship between the rating a program receives and how successful youth are in returning to mainstream society and subsequently school. Linear regression analysis is the main statistical method to answer four research questions designed to examine these potential relationship. A total of 177 Moderate and High Risk programs were included in the study and the QA scores they received over a three year were analyzed. Surprisingly, the research and subsequent analysis shows little relationship between educational program quality and success rates for juveniles exiting incarceration. This result may warrant further study as to the additional factors contributing to a youth's re-involvement in the juvenile justice system.
Title: EVALUATION OF JUVENILE JUSTICE EDUCATION PROGRAMS: WHAT THE NUMBERS SAY ABOUT JUVENILE RECIDIVISM.
20 views
9 downloads
Name(s): Egan, Kevin, Author
Murray, Kenneth, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2009
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Each year more than 100,000 juveniles are incarcerated in residential rehabilitative facilities. As part of their course of treatment, educational services are mandated for these incarcerated youth. Programs serving these individuals must provide adequate and appropriate educational programs for these juveniles. With a growing public concern over juvenile delinquency and recidivism, programs are being held accountable for the effectiveness and quality of the programming they offer. In Florida, juvenile justice programs offering educational services are monitored annually by the Juvenile Justice Education Enhancement Program. These programs receive a Quality Assurance (QA) rating as determined by a review team that spends several days in the program reviewing documentation and interviewing youth and program staff. This study proposes to examine any potential relationship between the rating a program receives and how successful youth are in returning to mainstream society and subsequently school. Linear regression analysis is the main statistical method to answer four research questions designed to examine these potential relationship. A total of 177 Moderate and High Risk programs were included in the study and the QA scores they received over a three year were analyzed. Surprisingly, the research and subsequent analysis shows little relationship between educational program quality and success rates for juveniles exiting incarceration. This result may warrant further study as to the additional factors contributing to a youth's re-involvement in the juvenile justice system.
Identifier: CFE0002854 (IID), ucf:48086 (fedora)
Note(s): 2009-12-01
Ed.D.
Education, Department of Educational Research Technology and Leadership
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Education
Juvenile Justice
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002854
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

In Collections