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PRIVACY, SURVEILLANCE AND THE STATE: A COMPARISON OF U.S. AND BRITISH PRIVACY RIGHTS

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Date Issued:
2009
Abstract/Description:
This study investigates the effects of institutional structure on the privacy rights regimes in the United States and the United Kingdom, from 2000-2006. The goal of this research is to analyze how variation in the institutional arrangements across these two countries allowed for more or less protection of privacy rights for citizens. Domestic terrorist attacks during the time period represent a catalyst for changes in police and government surveillance activities. Veto points literature provides the framework for institutional comparison. The first part of the research provides a discussion of the historical evolution of privacy rights in both states, focusing on government and police surveillance and investigations. The second part of the research, based on veto points theory, compares the institutional arrangements of the United States and the United Kingdom, and suggests that the number of veto points and the ideological proximity of veto players have had an effect on the formulation of policy. Laws governing surveillance, investigations and privacy in the year 2000 provide a benchmark for analyzing how policies change over time.
Title: PRIVACY, SURVEILLANCE AND THE STATE: A COMPARISON OF U.S. AND BRITISH PRIVACY RIGHTS.
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Name(s): Lander, Angelina, Author
Kinsey, Barbara Sgouraki, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2009
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study investigates the effects of institutional structure on the privacy rights regimes in the United States and the United Kingdom, from 2000-2006. The goal of this research is to analyze how variation in the institutional arrangements across these two countries allowed for more or less protection of privacy rights for citizens. Domestic terrorist attacks during the time period represent a catalyst for changes in police and government surveillance activities. Veto points literature provides the framework for institutional comparison. The first part of the research provides a discussion of the historical evolution of privacy rights in both states, focusing on government and police surveillance and investigations. The second part of the research, based on veto points theory, compares the institutional arrangements of the United States and the United Kingdom, and suggests that the number of veto points and the ideological proximity of veto players have had an effect on the formulation of policy. Laws governing surveillance, investigations and privacy in the year 2000 provide a benchmark for analyzing how policies change over time.
Identifier: CFE0002772 (IID), ucf:48095 (fedora)
Note(s): 2009-08-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Political Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): privacy
surveillance
veto points
veto players
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002772
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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