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CLAIMS OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY:AN EXAMINATION OF U.S. TELEVISION FOOD COMMERCIALS AND THE ADULT OBESITY ISSUE

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Date Issued:
2009
Abstract/Description:
Obesity is one of the major public health issues in the United States, often regarded as part of a global crisis. Companies invest billions of dollars each year towards television advertising campaigns aimed at convincing audiences how their ground-breaking discovery 'battles the bulge' or somehow offers an increased health benefit. This study examined how advertisers presented health-related claims, including health and nutrient-content claims, in U.S. adult-targeted television food commercials. The claims were compared to FTC, FDA, and USDA laws, regulations, and recommendations. A content analysis of food advertising was conducted of commercials from major and cable network programs broadcast during prime-time in the first quarter of 2009. The majority of claims match current regulations when compared to Federal references. The results show that Nutrient and Wellness claims were the most frequently cited. The type of benefit, Healthy Eating, emerged almost 3 times more than any other benefit type. This is also similar to those results which suggest advertisers' intentions were to promote overall wellness in their content delivery. As such, the Wellness Approach was identified and conceptualized, leading towards full development of a Wellness Effect theory. Implications and future research opportunities are discussed on both a theoretical and practical level.
Title: CLAIMS OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY:AN EXAMINATION OF U.S. TELEVISION FOOD COMMERCIALS AND THE ADULT OBESITY ISSUE.
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Name(s): Delgado, Cristina, Author
DeLorme, Denise, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2009
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Obesity is one of the major public health issues in the United States, often regarded as part of a global crisis. Companies invest billions of dollars each year towards television advertising campaigns aimed at convincing audiences how their ground-breaking discovery 'battles the bulge' or somehow offers an increased health benefit. This study examined how advertisers presented health-related claims, including health and nutrient-content claims, in U.S. adult-targeted television food commercials. The claims were compared to FTC, FDA, and USDA laws, regulations, and recommendations. A content analysis of food advertising was conducted of commercials from major and cable network programs broadcast during prime-time in the first quarter of 2009. The majority of claims match current regulations when compared to Federal references. The results show that Nutrient and Wellness claims were the most frequently cited. The type of benefit, Healthy Eating, emerged almost 3 times more than any other benefit type. This is also similar to those results which suggest advertisers' intentions were to promote overall wellness in their content delivery. As such, the Wellness Approach was identified and conceptualized, leading towards full development of a Wellness Effect theory. Implications and future research opportunities are discussed on both a theoretical and practical level.
Identifier: CFE0002565 (IID), ucf:48260 (fedora)
Note(s): 2009-05-01
M.A.
Sciences, Nicholson School of Communication
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): advertising
advertising appeals
advertising effects
advertising legislation
advertising regulation
advertising strategies
content analysis
marketing
mass communication
mass communication theory
cultivation theory
framing theory
semiotics theory
media
television advertising
television commercials
adult obesity
obesity
overweight
weight loss
health
health claims
health communication
health promotion
nutrient claims
public health
wellness
food
food advertising
nutrition
science
business
consumption
consumer affairs
consumer perceptions
consumer protection
Federal regulation
government
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0002565
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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