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A LIGHTING AND SCENIC DESIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDAÂÂ'SA SYMPHONY OF DANCE

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Date Issued:
2010
Abstract/Description:
ABSTRACT The beginnings of modern stage lighting emerged during the late 1800s when Adolphe Appia and Edward Gordon Craig theorized about the potential use of lighting to create plasticity in a theatrical production. Appia and Craig conducted experiments, only to find that the limitation of the instruments available at the time prevented the achievement of their theory. The next documented step was when Stanley McCandless proposed and published a system for implementing the Appia and Craig theory of plasticity. Stanley McCandlessÂÂ' lighting textbook, A Syllabus of Stage Lighting. The book broke down the elements and function of light; ultimately becoming the common practice of academic lighting designers. One of his students, Jean Rosenthal, studied the theory and became aware of its limitations. Jean Rosenthal attempted to apply the McCandless theory to dance and found that it was not useful for sculpting the body. She then developed a new technique that better served dance lighting and adhered to the ideas of Appia and Craig. RosenthalÂÂ's theory became the foundation of contemporary dance lighting practice. The aim of this thesis consists of four parts. First is to research the evolution of dance lighting, second is to explore and apply the Rosenthal Theory of Dance Lighting, third is to document the design process and the fourth part is the personal growth and development throughout this entire process. As the Lighting and Scenic Designer I will have extensive documentation of both the process of design and the production. I will also have documentation on my growth and development based on this thesis project.
Title: A LIGHTING AND SCENIC DESIGN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDAÂÂ'SA SYMPHONY OF DANCE.
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Name(s): Baldwin, Terra, Author
Scott, Hubert, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: ABSTRACT The beginnings of modern stage lighting emerged during the late 1800s when Adolphe Appia and Edward Gordon Craig theorized about the potential use of lighting to create plasticity in a theatrical production. Appia and Craig conducted experiments, only to find that the limitation of the instruments available at the time prevented the achievement of their theory. The next documented step was when Stanley McCandless proposed and published a system for implementing the Appia and Craig theory of plasticity. Stanley McCandlessÂÂ' lighting textbook, A Syllabus of Stage Lighting. The book broke down the elements and function of light; ultimately becoming the common practice of academic lighting designers. One of his students, Jean Rosenthal, studied the theory and became aware of its limitations. Jean Rosenthal attempted to apply the McCandless theory to dance and found that it was not useful for sculpting the body. She then developed a new technique that better served dance lighting and adhered to the ideas of Appia and Craig. RosenthalÂÂ's theory became the foundation of contemporary dance lighting practice. The aim of this thesis consists of four parts. First is to research the evolution of dance lighting, second is to explore and apply the Rosenthal Theory of Dance Lighting, third is to document the design process and the fourth part is the personal growth and development throughout this entire process. As the Lighting and Scenic Designer I will have extensive documentation of both the process of design and the production. I will also have documentation on my growth and development based on this thesis project.
Identifier: CFE0003282 (IID), ucf:48530 (fedora)
Note(s): 2010-08-01
M.F.A.
Arts and Humanities, Department of Theatre
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): lighting design
dance
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003282
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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