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A RELATIONSHIP STUDY OF STUDENT SATISFACTION WITH LEARNING ONLINE AND COGNITIVE LOAD

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Date Issued:
2010
Abstract/Description:
This study sought to explore if a relationship exists between cognitive load and student satisfaction with learning online. The study separates academic performance (a.k.a., ÂÂ"learningÂÂ") from cognitive load and satisfaction to better distinguish influences on cognition (from cognitive load) and motivation (from satisfaction). Considerations that remain critical to the field of instructional design, as they apply to learning online, were described and used to guide a review of the literature to find directions to fulfill the goal of this study. A survey was conducted and 1,401 students responded to an instrument that contained 24 items. Multiple analysis techniques found a positive, moderate, and significant (p < .01) correlation between cognitive load and satisfaction. Most importantly, the results found that approximately 25% of the variance in student satisfaction with learning online can be explained by cognitive load. New constructs emerged from a Principal Components Analysis that suggest a refined view of student perspectives and potential improvement to guide instructional design. Further, a correlation, even a moderate one, has not previously been found between cognitive load and satisfaction. The significance of this finding presents new opportunities to study and improve online instruction. Multiple opportunities for future research are briefly discussed and guidelines for developing online course designs using interpretations of the emerged factors are made.
Title: A RELATIONSHIP STUDY OF STUDENT SATISFACTION WITH LEARNING ONLINE AND COGNITIVE LOAD.
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Name(s): Bradford, George, Author
Dziuban, Charles, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study sought to explore if a relationship exists between cognitive load and student satisfaction with learning online. The study separates academic performance (a.k.a., ÂÂ"learningÂÂ") from cognitive load and satisfaction to better distinguish influences on cognition (from cognitive load) and motivation (from satisfaction). Considerations that remain critical to the field of instructional design, as they apply to learning online, were described and used to guide a review of the literature to find directions to fulfill the goal of this study. A survey was conducted and 1,401 students responded to an instrument that contained 24 items. Multiple analysis techniques found a positive, moderate, and significant (p < .01) correlation between cognitive load and satisfaction. Most importantly, the results found that approximately 25% of the variance in student satisfaction with learning online can be explained by cognitive load. New constructs emerged from a Principal Components Analysis that suggest a refined view of student perspectives and potential improvement to guide instructional design. Further, a correlation, even a moderate one, has not previously been found between cognitive load and satisfaction. The significance of this finding presents new opportunities to study and improve online instruction. Multiple opportunities for future research are briefly discussed and guidelines for developing online course designs using interpretations of the emerged factors are made.
Identifier: CFE0003164 (IID), ucf:48599 (fedora)
Note(s): 2010-05-01
Ph.D.
Education, Department of Educational Research Technology and Leadership
Doctorate
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): cognitive load
student
satisfaction
online
learning
multimedia
mental effort
cognition
motivation
e-learning
context
survey
quantitative analysis
relationship study
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003164
Restrictions on Access: campus 2011-05-01
Host Institution: UCF

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