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PALEOPATHOLOGY IN ANCIENT EGYPT: EVIDENCE FROM THE SITES OF DAYR AL-BARSHā AND SHEIKH SAID

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Date Issued:
2010
Abstract/Description:
For centuries, people have been fascinated with how the ancient Egyptians lived, and particularly how they died. Although Egyptologists in the past had a greater interest in the treasures that accompanied the dead, there has now been a shift in focus on the actual ancient Egyptians themselves and their ways of life. Recognizing the health and disease status of ancient Egyptians has become particularly important. The aim of this research project is to document the paleopathology of the individuals from the sites of Dayr al-Barshā and Sheikh Said encompassing the Old Kingdom (2686 – 2160 BC), the First Intermediate Period (2160 – 2055 BC), and the Middle Kingdom (2055-1650 BC) periods. The site of Dayr al-Barshā was most importantly the necropolis, or burial site, used by the inhabitants of the ancient city of Hermopolis Magna, and it was also a very prominent quarry site. Today, Dayr al-Barshā is a large scale archaeological site that has been divided into eleven zones. The results of this research reveal a documented list of paleopathologies that include traumatic conditions, congenital anomalies, joint diseases, infectious diseases, hematological disorders, dental pathology, neoplastic conditions, and various other conditions that ailed the people in their daily lives. Fractures and dental diseases are the paleopathologies that occurred most frequently. These pathologies provide important knowledge about the living conditions and occupations during the span of the Old Kingdom through the Middle Kingdom.
Title: PALEOPATHOLOGY IN ANCIENT EGYPT: EVIDENCE FROM THE SITES OF DAYR AL-BARSHā AND SHEIKH SAID.
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Name(s): Malnasi, Cindy, Author
Dupras, Tosha, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: For centuries, people have been fascinated with how the ancient Egyptians lived, and particularly how they died. Although Egyptologists in the past had a greater interest in the treasures that accompanied the dead, there has now been a shift in focus on the actual ancient Egyptians themselves and their ways of life. Recognizing the health and disease status of ancient Egyptians has become particularly important. The aim of this research project is to document the paleopathology of the individuals from the sites of Dayr al-Barshā and Sheikh Said encompassing the Old Kingdom (2686 – 2160 BC), the First Intermediate Period (2160 – 2055 BC), and the Middle Kingdom (2055-1650 BC) periods. The site of Dayr al-Barshā was most importantly the necropolis, or burial site, used by the inhabitants of the ancient city of Hermopolis Magna, and it was also a very prominent quarry site. Today, Dayr al-Barshā is a large scale archaeological site that has been divided into eleven zones. The results of this research reveal a documented list of paleopathologies that include traumatic conditions, congenital anomalies, joint diseases, infectious diseases, hematological disorders, dental pathology, neoplastic conditions, and various other conditions that ailed the people in their daily lives. Fractures and dental diseases are the paleopathologies that occurred most frequently. These pathologies provide important knowledge about the living conditions and occupations during the span of the Old Kingdom through the Middle Kingdom.
Identifier: CFE0003119 (IID), ucf:48643 (fedora)
Note(s): 2010-05-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Anthropology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Paleopathology
Disease
Traumatic conditions
parietal thinning
cribra orbitalia
osteoarthritis
diseases of the dentition
Ancient Egypt
Egyptology
Dayr al-Barsha
Sheikh Said
Old Kingdom
Middle Kingdom
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003119
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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