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IDENTIFICATION OF FABRICS LIKELY TO COLLECT AND DISPERSE FEL D 1

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Individuals sensitive to domestic cat allergen Fel d 1 experience a variety of symptoms including eye irritation, respiratory irritation, asthma, and severe respiratory distress. Fel d 1 is a protein produced in the saliva and on the skin of domestic cats. Previous studies have demonstrated that Fel d 1 adheres to clothing, upholstery, and human hair and has been found in non-cat environments in levels high enough to cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. In a general sense, two very different approaches have been adopted to study Fel d 1. One area of the literature focuses on the molecular biology of Fel d 1 and its functions at the cellular level. These studies hold long-term promise for an effective clinical response to this persistent allergen. An entirely separate literature focuses on immediate practical solutions that remove Fel d 1 from the domestic environment. Within this literature there has been minimal emphasis on the possibility that different fabrics may have different affinities for Fel d 1. Therefore, the affinity of Fel d 1 for different fabrics is the focus of this study. The findings from this study will be of use in reducing allergic reactions in sensitive individuals through the choice of appropriate fabrics in clothing and upholstery. Forty domestic household cats were chosen for this study. Each cat was rubbed, in a manner similar to petting, with an assembled fabric square based on a Latin-square design. Each Latin-square design consisted of a 6x6 fabric grid and included the fabrics silk dupioni, wool suiting, cotton denim, cotton damask, polyester suede and polyester knit. The random organization of the fabrics into the grid removed bias for the location of fabrics within the square during Fel d 1 collection. After rubbing, the Latin-square fabric block was disassembled and Fel d 1 was extracted from each fabric type and analyzed via quantitative ELISA. The results were statistically analyzed with a univariate ANOVA. Fabrics significantly differ (p<0.001) in Fel d 1 retention and fall into three groups. Silk dupioni collected the least amount of Fel d 1. Wool suiting, cotton denim and cotton damask were intermediate in Fel d 1 collection, while polyester suede and polyester knit collected the highest amounts of Fel d 1. Samples were also collected for a time study to determine if Fel d 1 bound on fabric degrades, or otherwise diminishes, over time. 14 weeks (approximately 3 months) after collection, Fel d 1 was extracted from fabrics and quantified by ELISA. A paired T-test was used to evaluate changes in Fel d 1 levels on specific fabrics over the 14 week period. When compared to extractions performed immediately after exposure, the amount of Fel d 1 released from specific fabrics after 14 weeks was significantly reduced. From these studies I conclude that an individual allergic to Fel d 1 may be able to limit their allergen exposure by selecting fabrics less likely to collect the allergen for their environment. Natural fibers (silk, wool, and cotton) collected less Fel d 1 than polyester fabrics, suggesting that natural fibers are recommended over fabrics containing polyester for persons allergic to cats.
Title: IDENTIFICATION OF FABRICS LIKELY TO COLLECT AND DISPERSE FEL D 1.
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Name(s): Jones, Mary, Author
von Kalm, Laurence, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Individuals sensitive to domestic cat allergen Fel d 1 experience a variety of symptoms including eye irritation, respiratory irritation, asthma, and severe respiratory distress. Fel d 1 is a protein produced in the saliva and on the skin of domestic cats. Previous studies have demonstrated that Fel d 1 adheres to clothing, upholstery, and human hair and has been found in non-cat environments in levels high enough to cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. In a general sense, two very different approaches have been adopted to study Fel d 1. One area of the literature focuses on the molecular biology of Fel d 1 and its functions at the cellular level. These studies hold long-term promise for an effective clinical response to this persistent allergen. An entirely separate literature focuses on immediate practical solutions that remove Fel d 1 from the domestic environment. Within this literature there has been minimal emphasis on the possibility that different fabrics may have different affinities for Fel d 1. Therefore, the affinity of Fel d 1 for different fabrics is the focus of this study. The findings from this study will be of use in reducing allergic reactions in sensitive individuals through the choice of appropriate fabrics in clothing and upholstery. Forty domestic household cats were chosen for this study. Each cat was rubbed, in a manner similar to petting, with an assembled fabric square based on a Latin-square design. Each Latin-square design consisted of a 6x6 fabric grid and included the fabrics silk dupioni, wool suiting, cotton denim, cotton damask, polyester suede and polyester knit. The random organization of the fabrics into the grid removed bias for the location of fabrics within the square during Fel d 1 collection. After rubbing, the Latin-square fabric block was disassembled and Fel d 1 was extracted from each fabric type and analyzed via quantitative ELISA. The results were statistically analyzed with a univariate ANOVA. Fabrics significantly differ (p<0.001) in Fel d 1 retention and fall into three groups. Silk dupioni collected the least amount of Fel d 1. Wool suiting, cotton denim and cotton damask were intermediate in Fel d 1 collection, while polyester suede and polyester knit collected the highest amounts of Fel d 1. Samples were also collected for a time study to determine if Fel d 1 bound on fabric degrades, or otherwise diminishes, over time. 14 weeks (approximately 3 months) after collection, Fel d 1 was extracted from fabrics and quantified by ELISA. A paired T-test was used to evaluate changes in Fel d 1 levels on specific fabrics over the 14 week period. When compared to extractions performed immediately after exposure, the amount of Fel d 1 released from specific fabrics after 14 weeks was significantly reduced. From these studies I conclude that an individual allergic to Fel d 1 may be able to limit their allergen exposure by selecting fabrics less likely to collect the allergen for their environment. Natural fibers (silk, wool, and cotton) collected less Fel d 1 than polyester fabrics, suggesting that natural fibers are recommended over fabrics containing polyester for persons allergic to cats.
Identifier: CFE0003963 (IID), ucf:48710 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-08-01
M.S.
Sciences, Department of Biology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Fel d 1
Cat Allergen
Fabric
ELISA
Protein
Allergy
Asthma
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003963
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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