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VIRTUALIZATION AND SELF-ORGANIZATION FOR UTILITY COMPUTING

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
We present an alternative paradigm for utility computing when the delivery of service is subject to binding contracts; the solution we propose is based on resource virtualization and a self-management scheme. A virtual cloud aggregates set virtual machines to work in concert for the tasks specified by the service agreement. A first step for the establishment of a virtual cloud is to create a scale-free overlay network through a biased random walk; scale-free networks enjoy a set of remarkable properties such as: robustness against random failures, favorable scaling, and resilience to congestion, small diameter, and average path length. Constrains such as limits on the cost of per unit of service, total cost, or the requirement to use only "green" computing cycles are then considered when a node of this overlay network decides whether to join the virtual cloud or not. A VIRTUAL CLOUD consists of a subset of the nodes assigned to the tasks specified by a Service Level Agreement, SLA, as well as a virtual interconnection network, or overlay network, for the virtual cloud. SLAs could serve as a congestion control mechanism for an organization providing utility computing; this mechanism allows the system to reject new contracts when there is the danger of overloading the system and failing to fulfill existing contractual obligations. The objective of this thesis is to show that biased random walks in power law networks are capable of responding to dynamic changes of the workload in utility computing.
Title: VIRTUALIZATION AND SELF-ORGANIZATION FOR UTILITY COMPUTING.
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Name(s): Saleh, Mehdi, Author
Marinescu, Dan, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: We present an alternative paradigm for utility computing when the delivery of service is subject to binding contracts; the solution we propose is based on resource virtualization and a self-management scheme. A virtual cloud aggregates set virtual machines to work in concert for the tasks specified by the service agreement. A first step for the establishment of a virtual cloud is to create a scale-free overlay network through a biased random walk; scale-free networks enjoy a set of remarkable properties such as: robustness against random failures, favorable scaling, and resilience to congestion, small diameter, and average path length. Constrains such as limits on the cost of per unit of service, total cost, or the requirement to use only "green" computing cycles are then considered when a node of this overlay network decides whether to join the virtual cloud or not. A VIRTUAL CLOUD consists of a subset of the nodes assigned to the tasks specified by a Service Level Agreement, SLA, as well as a virtual interconnection network, or overlay network, for the virtual cloud. SLAs could serve as a congestion control mechanism for an organization providing utility computing; this mechanism allows the system to reject new contracts when there is the danger of overloading the system and failing to fulfill existing contractual obligations. The objective of this thesis is to show that biased random walks in power law networks are capable of responding to dynamic changes of the workload in utility computing.
Identifier: CFE0003725 (IID), ucf:48768 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
M.S.
Engineering and Computer Science, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Utility Computing
Scale-Free Networks
Congestion Control Mechanism
Virtual Clouds
Self-Organization
Self-Management
Dynamic Load Management
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003725
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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