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FACTORS RELATED TO BIRTH TRANSITION SUCCESS OF LATE PRETERM INFANTS

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Problem: Identifying the factors effecting birth transition success of late preterm infants may improve early recognition of newborn compromise. Multiple explanatory variables may be associated with birth transition success or failure. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of, and clinical-epidemiological and demographic predictive factors for birth transition success of late preterm infants. Methods: A retrospective case-control chart review was used to compare the characteristics of successful and unsuccessful birth transition of 35 and 36 week gestational age late-preterm infants delivered in a large tertiary-care center during calendar year 2007. A mixture of categorical and numeric variables related to maternal, birth, and physiologic constructs were analyzed for their effects on birth transition as a binary outcome variable (success or failure). Results: Of 22 variables tested, four predictor variables were associated with birth transition failure: labor (OR = .42, p = .014), 5-minute Apgar score (OR = 1.79, p = .043), gender (OR = .47, p =.003), and respiratory rate (OR= 2.08, p = .001) as tested by logistic regression. The model was able to accurately assign transition failure and success at a rate of 66.7% and 74% respectively. The overall model was statistically significant (likelihood ratio chi square = 38.97(4), p <.001). The Hosmer & Lemseshow test indicated that the model estimates fit the data at an acceptable level (X2 = 7.72, p = .358). Discussion/Implication: The absence of labor was identified as a risk factor for transition failure in this population. Male preterm infants were nearly twice as likely to fail transition as females in this population. The case group had a higher frequency of lower 5-minute Apgar scores, resulting in significantly lower mean scores. The failed transition group had more than twice the number of newborns with abnormally high respirations than the control group. These findings indicate that identification infants at risk for birth transition failure begins with the recognition of the absence of labor as a significant risk factor for birth transition failure of late preterm infants.
Title: FACTORS RELATED TO BIRTH TRANSITION SUCCESS OF LATE PRETERM INFANTS.
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Name(s): Wright, Karen, Author
Byers, Jacqueline, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Problem: Identifying the factors effecting birth transition success of late preterm infants may improve early recognition of newborn compromise. Multiple explanatory variables may be associated with birth transition success or failure. The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of, and clinical-epidemiological and demographic predictive factors for birth transition success of late preterm infants. Methods: A retrospective case-control chart review was used to compare the characteristics of successful and unsuccessful birth transition of 35 and 36 week gestational age late-preterm infants delivered in a large tertiary-care center during calendar year 2007. A mixture of categorical and numeric variables related to maternal, birth, and physiologic constructs were analyzed for their effects on birth transition as a binary outcome variable (success or failure). Results: Of 22 variables tested, four predictor variables were associated with birth transition failure: labor (OR = .42, p = .014), 5-minute Apgar score (OR = 1.79, p = .043), gender (OR = .47, p =.003), and respiratory rate (OR= 2.08, p = .001) as tested by logistic regression. The model was able to accurately assign transition failure and success at a rate of 66.7% and 74% respectively. The overall model was statistically significant (likelihood ratio chi square = 38.97(4), p <.001). The Hosmer & Lemseshow test indicated that the model estimates fit the data at an acceptable level (X2 = 7.72, p = .358). Discussion/Implication: The absence of labor was identified as a risk factor for transition failure in this population. Male preterm infants were nearly twice as likely to fail transition as females in this population. The case group had a higher frequency of lower 5-minute Apgar scores, resulting in significantly lower mean scores. The failed transition group had more than twice the number of newborns with abnormally high respirations than the control group. These findings indicate that identification infants at risk for birth transition failure begins with the recognition of the absence of labor as a significant risk factor for birth transition failure of late preterm infants.
Identifier: CFE0003655 (IID), ucf:48818 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
Ph.D.
Other, School of Nursing
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): birth
transition
late preterm
infant
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003655
Restrictions on Access: campus 2012-04-01
Host Institution: UCF

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