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DIVIDED GOVERNMENT AND CONGRESSIONAL FOREIGN POLICY: A CASE STUDY OF THE POST-WORLD WAR II ERA IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between the executive and legislative branches of American federal government, during periods within which these two branches are led by different political parties, to discover whether the legislative branch attempts to independently legislate and enact foreign policy by using "the power of the purse" to either appropriate in support of or refuse to appropriate in opposition to military engagement abroad. The methodology for this research includes the analysis and comparison of certain variables, including public opinion, budgetary constraints, and the relative majority of the party that holds power in one or both chambers, and the ways these variables may impact the behavior of the legislative branch in this regard. It also includes the analysis of appropriations requests made by the legislative branch for funding military engagement in rejection of requests from the executive branch for all military engagements that occurred during periods of divided government from 1946 through 2009.
Title: DIVIDED GOVERNMENT AND CONGRESSIONAL FOREIGN POLICY: A CASE STUDY OF THE POST-WORLD WAR II ERA IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT.
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Name(s): Feinman, David, Author
Houghton, David, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between the executive and legislative branches of American federal government, during periods within which these two branches are led by different political parties, to discover whether the legislative branch attempts to independently legislate and enact foreign policy by using "the power of the purse" to either appropriate in support of or refuse to appropriate in opposition to military engagement abroad. The methodology for this research includes the analysis and comparison of certain variables, including public opinion, budgetary constraints, and the relative majority of the party that holds power in one or both chambers, and the ways these variables may impact the behavior of the legislative branch in this regard. It also includes the analysis of appropriations requests made by the legislative branch for funding military engagement in rejection of requests from the executive branch for all military engagements that occurred during periods of divided government from 1946 through 2009.
Identifier: CFE0003657 (IID), ucf:48840 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Political Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): American
America
United
States
government
Congress
House
Representatives
Senate
foreign
policy
divided
executive
legislative
Democrat
Republican
legislate
appropriation
appropriate
military
war
public
opinion
budget
budgetary
majority
President
unemployment
inflation
debt
power
precedent
separation
powers
Constitution
Iraq
Afghanistan
Vietnam
Kosovo
Serbia
NATO
Libya
Obama
Bush
Clinton
Reagan
Nixon
Ford
Eisenhower
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003657
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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