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FRAMING RACIAL INEQUALITY: REASSESSING THE EFFECT OF RELIGION ON RACIAL ATTITUDES

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Building on previous work on racial attitudes among the religious, this study reassesses the effects of religion on individuals' beliefs about racial inequality. This study relies on recent developments in the sociology of culture, which conceives of culture as a frame through which individuals interpret the world in which they inhabit (Benford and Snow 2000; Harding 2007; Small 2002, 2004). Religion is held to be an important social institution that provides substance to the frames that individuals employ for interpreting racial inequality. Two particular developments from this literature inform this study: first, that individuals can employ different, even contradictory, frames simultaneously, and second, that frames are dynamic processes that can change over time. This study utilizes the General Social Survey from 1985 to 2008 and uses a theoretically informed and improved methodology for assessing beliefs about racial inequality. Three conclusions are drawn: 1) religion continues to play a role in shaping individuals' beliefs about racial inequality, 2) it is important to differentiate between "pure" frames and frames that combine different explanations for racial inequality when understanding the role of religion in forming beliefs about black-white inequality, and 3) frames for racial inequality undergo change over time, though the pattern of change depends upon the frame for racial inequality.
Title: FRAMING RACIAL INEQUALITY: REASSESSING THE EFFECT OF RELIGION ON RACIAL ATTITUDES.
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Name(s): Kaufman II, Jerrold, Author
Carter, J. Scott, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Building on previous work on racial attitudes among the religious, this study reassesses the effects of religion on individuals' beliefs about racial inequality. This study relies on recent developments in the sociology of culture, which conceives of culture as a frame through which individuals interpret the world in which they inhabit (Benford and Snow 2000; Harding 2007; Small 2002, 2004). Religion is held to be an important social institution that provides substance to the frames that individuals employ for interpreting racial inequality. Two particular developments from this literature inform this study: first, that individuals can employ different, even contradictory, frames simultaneously, and second, that frames are dynamic processes that can change over time. This study utilizes the General Social Survey from 1985 to 2008 and uses a theoretically informed and improved methodology for assessing beliefs about racial inequality. Three conclusions are drawn: 1) religion continues to play a role in shaping individuals' beliefs about racial inequality, 2) it is important to differentiate between "pure" frames and frames that combine different explanations for racial inequality when understanding the role of religion in forming beliefs about black-white inequality, and 3) frames for racial inequality undergo change over time, though the pattern of change depends upon the frame for racial inequality.
Identifier: CFE0003650 (IID), ucf:48842 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
M.A.
Sciences, Department of Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): racial attitudes
religion
culture
inequality
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003650
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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