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INFRARED PHASED-ARRAY ANTENNA-COUPLED TUNNEL DIODES

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
Infrared (IR) dipole antenna-coupled metal-oxide-metal (MOM) tunnel diodes provide a unique detection mechanism that allows for determination of the polarization and wavelength of an optical field. By integrating the MOM diode into a phased-array antenna, the angle of arrival and degree of coherence of received IR radiation can be determined. The angular response characteristics of IR dipole antennas are determined by boundary conditions imposed by the surrounding dielectric or conductive environment on the radiated fields. To explore the influence of the substrate configuration, single dipole antennas are fabricated on both planar and hemispherical lens substrates. Measurements demonstrate that the angular response can be tailored by the thickness of the electrical isolation stand-off layer on which the detector is fabricated and/or the inclusion of a ground plane. Directional detection of IR radiation is achieved with a pair of dipole antennas coupled to a MOM diode through a coplanar strip transmission line. The direction of maximum angular response is altered by varying the position of the diode along the transmission line connecting the antenna elements. By fabricating the devices on a quarter wave layer above a ground plane, narrow beam widths of 35° full width at half maximum and reception angles of ± 50° are achievable with minimal side-lobe contributions. Phased-array antennas can also be used to assess the degree of coherence of a partially coherent field. For a two-element array, the degree of coherence is a measure of the correlation of electric fields received by the antennas as a function of the element separation.
Title: INFRARED PHASED-ARRAY ANTENNA-COUPLED TUNNEL DIODES.
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Name(s): Slovick, Brian, Author
Boreman, Glenn, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Infrared (IR) dipole antenna-coupled metal-oxide-metal (MOM) tunnel diodes provide a unique detection mechanism that allows for determination of the polarization and wavelength of an optical field. By integrating the MOM diode into a phased-array antenna, the angle of arrival and degree of coherence of received IR radiation can be determined. The angular response characteristics of IR dipole antennas are determined by boundary conditions imposed by the surrounding dielectric or conductive environment on the radiated fields. To explore the influence of the substrate configuration, single dipole antennas are fabricated on both planar and hemispherical lens substrates. Measurements demonstrate that the angular response can be tailored by the thickness of the electrical isolation stand-off layer on which the detector is fabricated and/or the inclusion of a ground plane. Directional detection of IR radiation is achieved with a pair of dipole antennas coupled to a MOM diode through a coplanar strip transmission line. The direction of maximum angular response is altered by varying the position of the diode along the transmission line connecting the antenna elements. By fabricating the devices on a quarter wave layer above a ground plane, narrow beam widths of 35° full width at half maximum and reception angles of ± 50° are achievable with minimal side-lobe contributions. Phased-array antennas can also be used to assess the degree of coherence of a partially coherent field. For a two-element array, the degree of coherence is a measure of the correlation of electric fields received by the antennas as a function of the element separation.
Identifier: CFE0003589 (IID), ucf:48926 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-05-01
Ph.D.
Optics and Photonics, College of Optics and Photonics
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Infrared detectors
phased-array antennas
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003589
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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