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SOCIAL COMPARISON, SELF-OBJECTIFICATION, AND OBJECTIFICATION OF OTHERS: INVESTIGATING THE VICIOUS CYCLE THAT LEADS TO BODY DISSATISFACTION AND DISORDERED EATING

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Date Issued:
2010
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this study was to test a new theoretical model that integrates self-objectification, objectification of others, and social comparison as contributors to the development and maintenance of body image disturbance and disordered eating behavior. Within the new theoretical model, self-objectification, objectification of others, and social comparison are conceptualized as a self-perpetuating cycle, rather than as processes that occur independently of one another. Four hundred fifty-nine female college students between the ages of 18 and 32 completed measures of self-objectification, objectification of others, social comparison, body shame, body dissatisfaction, and eating disorder symptomatology. Structural equation modeling with nested model comparisons was used to examine the fit of the new theoretical model relative to less complex models which contain only relationships which have received previous attention in the research literature (e.g., the relationship between self-objectification and body shame). Results indicated that the new theoretical model demonstrates good fit for the data and that the fit of this model is significantly better than the original model suggested by the literature. Hierarchical multiple regression and mediational analyses also provided support for the interplay between objectification and social comparison. Implications for clinical work as well as theory and measurement will be discussed.
Title: SOCIAL COMPARISON, SELF-OBJECTIFICATION, AND OBJECTIFICATION OF OTHERS: INVESTIGATING THE VICIOUS CYCLE THAT LEADS TO BODY DISSATISFACTION AND DISORDERED EATING.
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Name(s): Lindner, Danielle, Author
Dunn, Stacey, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this study was to test a new theoretical model that integrates self-objectification, objectification of others, and social comparison as contributors to the development and maintenance of body image disturbance and disordered eating behavior. Within the new theoretical model, self-objectification, objectification of others, and social comparison are conceptualized as a self-perpetuating cycle, rather than as processes that occur independently of one another. Four hundred fifty-nine female college students between the ages of 18 and 32 completed measures of self-objectification, objectification of others, social comparison, body shame, body dissatisfaction, and eating disorder symptomatology. Structural equation modeling with nested model comparisons was used to examine the fit of the new theoretical model relative to less complex models which contain only relationships which have received previous attention in the research literature (e.g., the relationship between self-objectification and body shame). Results indicated that the new theoretical model demonstrates good fit for the data and that the fit of this model is significantly better than the original model suggested by the literature. Hierarchical multiple regression and mediational analyses also provided support for the interplay between objectification and social comparison. Implications for clinical work as well as theory and measurement will be discussed.
Identifier: CFE0003492 (IID), ucf:48938 (fedora)
Note(s): 2010-12-01
M.S.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): social comparison
objectification
body image
eating disorder
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003492
Restrictions on Access: campus 2012-06-01
Host Institution: UCF

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