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HOW DO SITUATIONAL JUDGMENT TESTS AND SITUATIONAL INTERVIEWS COMPARE? AN EXAMINATION OF CONSTRUCT AND CRITERION-RELATED VALIDITY

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Date Issued:
2010
Abstract/Description:
This study replicated and extended an earlier study by Banki and Latham (2010) and developed an equivalent SJT and SI in order to examine whether the two methods correlated differently with cognitive ability, personality, job experience, and job performance. The results of this study showed that the SJT and SI only correlated .20 and that the correlations for the SI with Extraversion, customer service experience, and overall work experience were significantly different from the correlations for the SJT. Participants felt that the SJT and SI provided the same opportunity to perform oneÂÂ's skills and level of scoring consistency. However, participants felt significantly more anxiety during the SI than the SJT. The practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.
Title: HOW DO SITUATIONAL JUDGMENT TESTS AND SITUATIONAL INTERVIEWS COMPARE? AN EXAMINATION OF CONSTRUCT AND CRITERION-RELATED VALIDITY.
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Name(s): Gunter, James, Author
Fritzsche, Barbara, Committee Chair
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study replicated and extended an earlier study by Banki and Latham (2010) and developed an equivalent SJT and SI in order to examine whether the two methods correlated differently with cognitive ability, personality, job experience, and job performance. The results of this study showed that the SJT and SI only correlated .20 and that the correlations for the SI with Extraversion, customer service experience, and overall work experience were significantly different from the correlations for the SJT. Participants felt that the SJT and SI provided the same opportunity to perform oneÂÂ's skills and level of scoring consistency. However, participants felt significantly more anxiety during the SI than the SJT. The practical and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.
Identifier: CFE0003522 (IID), ucf:48941 (fedora)
Note(s): 2010-12-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Department of Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): situational judgment tests
situational interviews
construct
criterion
validity
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0003522
Restrictions on Access: public
Host Institution: UCF

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