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Direct and Indirect Controls as Measures of Attachment: Gender, Delinquency, and the Parental Social Bond

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
Research specific to gender and violent juvenile delinquency is sparse due to two factors: a substantially higher incidence of delinquent male violence and the cost associated with drawing adequate female samples is frequently prohibitive (Howell, 2003). Gender-differences are explored in a sample of arrested juveniles using an expanded measure of parental attachment [bond]. The dimensions of emotional attachment, supervision, and time-involvement with a self-reported caregiver are explored for between group differences and association with recognized risk factors for juvenile delinquency. Findings indicate that while statistically significant between-group differences are not found in the presentation of attachment, descriptive differences do exist. Females demonstrated a higher level of impairment in emotional attachment to a caregiver than their male counterparts; females arrested for a violent offense reported the highest level of problem in this area. Findings also indicate that the mechanism of attachment appears to function differently by gender group in terms of association with risk factors for delinquency. Time-involvement emerged as an important predictor for the full group and the female group, particularly in relationship with higher risk for antisocial peer involvement. Support for a gendered experience of parental attachment [social bond] is provided. Emotional attachment and time-involvement were found to be important predictors for the full group, while supervision was not indicated as important to any risk factor or to recidivism. The current research advances knowledge on gender-related differences within delinquency. Through enhancing the understanding of the complex gender-specific influences on juvenile crime, criminal justice and human service systems may better learn to address these needs thereby reducing both entrance rates into the juvenile justice system and recidivism.
Title: Direct and Indirect Controls as Measures of Attachment: Gender, Delinquency, and the Parental Social Bond.
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Name(s): Hazlett-Knudsen, Rebekah, Author
Ronnau, John, Committee Chair
Surette, Raymond, Committee Member
Lawrence, Shawn, Committee Member
Bricout, John, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Research specific to gender and violent juvenile delinquency is sparse due to two factors: a substantially higher incidence of delinquent male violence and the cost associated with drawing adequate female samples is frequently prohibitive (Howell, 2003). Gender-differences are explored in a sample of arrested juveniles using an expanded measure of parental attachment [bond]. The dimensions of emotional attachment, supervision, and time-involvement with a self-reported caregiver are explored for between group differences and association with recognized risk factors for juvenile delinquency. Findings indicate that while statistically significant between-group differences are not found in the presentation of attachment, descriptive differences do exist. Females demonstrated a higher level of impairment in emotional attachment to a caregiver than their male counterparts; females arrested for a violent offense reported the highest level of problem in this area. Findings also indicate that the mechanism of attachment appears to function differently by gender group in terms of association with risk factors for delinquency. Time-involvement emerged as an important predictor for the full group and the female group, particularly in relationship with higher risk for antisocial peer involvement. Support for a gendered experience of parental attachment [social bond] is provided. Emotional attachment and time-involvement were found to be important predictors for the full group, while supervision was not indicated as important to any risk factor or to recidivism. The current research advances knowledge on gender-related differences within delinquency. Through enhancing the understanding of the complex gender-specific influences on juvenile crime, criminal justice and human service systems may better learn to address these needs thereby reducing both entrance rates into the juvenile justice system and recidivism.
Identifier: CFE0004218 (IID), ucf:48990 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
Ph.D.
Health and Public Affairs, Dean's Office COHPA
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): juvenile delinquency -- gender differences -- social control
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004218
Restrictions on Access: campus 2013-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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