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Brightness Temperature Calibration of SAC-D/Aquarius Microwave Radiometer (MWR)

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
The Aquarius/SAC-D joint international science mission, between the NationalAeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of United States and the Argentine Space Agency (Comision Nacional de Actividades Espaciales, CONAE), was launched on a polar-orbiting satellite on June 10, 2011. This mission of discovery will provide measurements of the global sea surface salinity, which contributes to understanding climatic changes in the global water cycle and how these variations inuence the general ocean circulation. The Microwave Radiometer (MWR), a three channel Dicke radiometer operating at 23.8 GHz H-Pol and 36.5 GHz V-(&) H-Pol provided by CONAE, will complement Aquarius (NASA's L-band radiometer/scatterometer) by providing simultaneous spatially collocated environmental measurements such as water vapor, cloud liquid water, surface wind speed, rain rate and sea ice concentration.This dissertation focuses on the overall radiometric calibration of MWR instrument.Which means establishing a transfer function that relates the instrument output to the antenna brightness temperature (Tb). To achieve this goal, the dissertation describes a microwave radiative transfer model of the instrument and validates it using the laboratory and thermal-vacuum test data. This involves estimation of the losses and physical temperature profile in the path from the receiver to each antenna feed-horn for all the receivers. As the pre-launch laboratory tests can only provide a simulated environment which is very different from the operational environment in space, an on-orbit calibration of the instrument is very important. Inter-satellite radiometric cross-calibration of MWR using the Naval Research Laboratory's multi-frequency polarimetric microwave radiometer, WindSat, on board the Coriolis satellite is also an important part of this dissertation. Cross-calibration between two different satellite instruments require normalization of Tb's to account for the frequency and incidence angle dierence between the instruments. Also inter-satellite calibration helps to determine accurate antenna pattern correction coefficients and other small instrument biases.
Title: Brightness Temperature Calibration of SAC-D/Aquarius Microwave Radiometer (MWR).
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Name(s): Biswas, Sayak, Author
Jones, W, Committee Chair
Georgiopoulos, Michael, Committee Member
Wahid, Parveen, Committee Member
Wilheit, Thomas, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The Aquarius/SAC-D joint international science mission, between the NationalAeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of United States and the Argentine Space Agency (Comision Nacional de Actividades Espaciales, CONAE), was launched on a polar-orbiting satellite on June 10, 2011. This mission of discovery will provide measurements of the global sea surface salinity, which contributes to understanding climatic changes in the global water cycle and how these variations inuence the general ocean circulation. The Microwave Radiometer (MWR), a three channel Dicke radiometer operating at 23.8 GHz H-Pol and 36.5 GHz V-(&) H-Pol provided by CONAE, will complement Aquarius (NASA's L-band radiometer/scatterometer) by providing simultaneous spatially collocated environmental measurements such as water vapor, cloud liquid water, surface wind speed, rain rate and sea ice concentration.This dissertation focuses on the overall radiometric calibration of MWR instrument.Which means establishing a transfer function that relates the instrument output to the antenna brightness temperature (Tb). To achieve this goal, the dissertation describes a microwave radiative transfer model of the instrument and validates it using the laboratory and thermal-vacuum test data. This involves estimation of the losses and physical temperature profile in the path from the receiver to each antenna feed-horn for all the receivers. As the pre-launch laboratory tests can only provide a simulated environment which is very different from the operational environment in space, an on-orbit calibration of the instrument is very important. Inter-satellite radiometric cross-calibration of MWR using the Naval Research Laboratory's multi-frequency polarimetric microwave radiometer, WindSat, on board the Coriolis satellite is also an important part of this dissertation. Cross-calibration between two different satellite instruments require normalization of Tb's to account for the frequency and incidence angle dierence between the instruments. Also inter-satellite calibration helps to determine accurate antenna pattern correction coefficients and other small instrument biases.
Identifier: CFE0004200 (IID), ucf:49033 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Calibration -- microwave -- radiometer -- SAC-D -- MWR -- brightness temperature
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004200
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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