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The Extension of Imperial Authority Under Diocletian and the Tetrarchy, 285-305CE

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
Despite a vast amount of research on Late Antiquity, little attention has been paid to certain figures that prove to be influential during this time. The focus of historians on Constantine I, the first Roman Emperor to allegedly convert to Christianity, has often come at the cost of ignoring Constantine's predecessor, Diocletian, sometimes known as the "Second Father of the Roman Empire". The success of Constantine's empire has often been attributed to the work and reforms of Diocletian, but there have been very few studies of the man beyond simple biography. This work will attempt to view three of Diocletian's major innovations in order to determine the lasting effect they had over the Roman Empire and our modern world. By studying 1) Diocletian's assumption of new, divinely inspired titles; 2)Diocletian's efforts at controlling prices in the marketplace; and 3)Diocletian's Persecution of the Christians in the Roman Empire at the turn of the fourth century CE, we can gain valuable insight into the ways through which Roman Emperors extended their authority throughout different facets of Ancient World, including developments that would shape the future of Western Civilization for the next 1400 years.
Title: The Extension of Imperial Authority Under Diocletian and the Tetrarchy, 285-305CE.
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Name(s): Petitt, Joshua, Author
Larson, Peter, Committee Chair
Dandrow, Edward, Committee CoChair
Solonari, Vladimir, Committee Member
Cassanello, Robert, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Despite a vast amount of research on Late Antiquity, little attention has been paid to certain figures that prove to be influential during this time. The focus of historians on Constantine I, the first Roman Emperor to allegedly convert to Christianity, has often come at the cost of ignoring Constantine's predecessor, Diocletian, sometimes known as the "Second Father of the Roman Empire". The success of Constantine's empire has often been attributed to the work and reforms of Diocletian, but there have been very few studies of the man beyond simple biography. This work will attempt to view three of Diocletian's major innovations in order to determine the lasting effect they had over the Roman Empire and our modern world. By studying 1) Diocletian's assumption of new, divinely inspired titles; 2)Diocletian's efforts at controlling prices in the marketplace; and 3)Diocletian's Persecution of the Christians in the Roman Empire at the turn of the fourth century CE, we can gain valuable insight into the ways through which Roman Emperors extended their authority throughout different facets of Ancient World, including developments that would shape the future of Western Civilization for the next 1400 years.
Identifier: CFE0004582 (IID), ucf:49190 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-12-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, History
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Diocletian -- Christian Persecution -- Tetrarchy -- Price Edict -- Herculius -- Jovius
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004582
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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