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Maritime Pirates and Foreign Terrorist Organizations: Complicit Against the United States and NATO?

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
Maritime piracy, a phenomenon which has plagued free maritime trade for thousands of years, has entered a new age of sophistication and global reverberation. These acts of illegal criminal activity in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries yield a significant profit margin for the perpetrators while creating considerable cost for ransom payments, security measures, capital, and human life. The classification of maritime pirates, as either criminals hoping to gain financial income or terrorists hoping to usher in political change, is warranted and compelling. If maritime pirates conduct their operations to institute political change, it is possible that flags of the United States and its allies can be more susceptible to pirate attacks than others. The author argues that although the definitional separation of (")maritime piracy(") and (")terrorism(") is becoming increasingly blurred in the twenty-first century, pirates will attack ships based on convenience and opportunity rather than based on the flags of vessels. Testing of this theory will be based on quantitative data produced by the International Maritime Bureau to test pirates' ideologies as a variable. To test if deprivation is a variable to consider, the author will also compare Indonesian economic performance with the frequency of attempted pirate attacks off its waters.
Title: Maritime Pirates and Foreign Terrorist Organizations: Complicit Against the United States and NATO?.
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Name(s): Lusk, William, Author
Morales, Waltraud, Committee Chair
Knuckey, Jonathan, Committee Member
Vasquez, Joseph, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Maritime piracy, a phenomenon which has plagued free maritime trade for thousands of years, has entered a new age of sophistication and global reverberation. These acts of illegal criminal activity in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries yield a significant profit margin for the perpetrators while creating considerable cost for ransom payments, security measures, capital, and human life. The classification of maritime pirates, as either criminals hoping to gain financial income or terrorists hoping to usher in political change, is warranted and compelling. If maritime pirates conduct their operations to institute political change, it is possible that flags of the United States and its allies can be more susceptible to pirate attacks than others. The author argues that although the definitional separation of (")maritime piracy(") and (")terrorism(") is becoming increasingly blurred in the twenty-first century, pirates will attack ships based on convenience and opportunity rather than based on the flags of vessels. Testing of this theory will be based on quantitative data produced by the International Maritime Bureau to test pirates' ideologies as a variable. To test if deprivation is a variable to consider, the author will also compare Indonesian economic performance with the frequency of attempted pirate attacks off its waters.
Identifier: CFE0004573 (IID), ucf:49201 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-12-01
M.A.
Sciences, Political Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): pirates -- Somalia -- Indonesia -- United States -- NATO -- maritime law -- al-Shabbab -- maritime terrorism -- vessel hijacking
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004573
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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