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The Community College Baccalaureate and Adult Students: A Qualitative Analysis

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
The focus of this qualitative research was to investigate the motivations, experiences, and constructs of non-traditional adult students who elected to enroll in community college baccalaureate programs. The participants in this investigation were a homogeneous sample of adult students who had priorities other than school, such as employment and families. The research questions which guided the study sought to explore the narratives adult students shared of their reasons for choosing to enroll in a community college baccalaureate degree program, how they described meaning to having access to these new degrees, and what impact the community college baccalaureate had on the decision to return for the bachelor degree. The voices of the students were captured during semi-structured individual interviews.Six central themes emerged from the data gathered: Resiliency vs. Obstacles: Managing Life, Finding Self Through Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivational Factors, The Community College Degree as Key to Economic Stability, Limited Alternatives to Baccalaureate Degree Attainment, Importance of Communality to Adult Students Feelings of Belonging, and Neither Difference nor Disadvantage to Obtaining a Community College Baccalaureate Degree.The study's results led to recommendations and implications for legislators, higher education faculty and administrators, and admissions and marketing specialists.
Title: The Community College Baccalaureate and Adult Students: A Qualitative Analysis.
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Name(s): Kersenbrock, Angela, Author
Cintron Delgado, Rosa, Committee Chair
Boyd, Tammy, Committee Member
Owens, James, Committee Member
Whiteman, JoAnn, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The focus of this qualitative research was to investigate the motivations, experiences, and constructs of non-traditional adult students who elected to enroll in community college baccalaureate programs. The participants in this investigation were a homogeneous sample of adult students who had priorities other than school, such as employment and families. The research questions which guided the study sought to explore the narratives adult students shared of their reasons for choosing to enroll in a community college baccalaureate degree program, how they described meaning to having access to these new degrees, and what impact the community college baccalaureate had on the decision to return for the bachelor degree. The voices of the students were captured during semi-structured individual interviews.Six central themes emerged from the data gathered: Resiliency vs. Obstacles: Managing Life, Finding Self Through Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivational Factors, The Community College Degree as Key to Economic Stability, Limited Alternatives to Baccalaureate Degree Attainment, Importance of Communality to Adult Students Feelings of Belonging, and Neither Difference nor Disadvantage to Obtaining a Community College Baccalaureate Degree.The study's results led to recommendations and implications for legislators, higher education faculty and administrators, and admissions and marketing specialists.
Identifier: CFE0004561 (IID), ucf:49243 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-12-01
Ed.D.
Education, Educational and Human Sciences
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Community College Baccalaureate -- Adult Students -- Non-traditional Students
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004561
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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