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Exploring Theology and Practice in Islamic Parenting

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
The purpose of this study is to explore Muslims' parenting styles and determine how factors such as religion, education, income, physical and verbal punishment experienced as a child, and the perception of Islamic childrearing influence their parenting styles. The research focuses on the main tenets of parenting in the Islamic tradition such as fatherhood, motherhood, children's and parent's rights and responsibilities, discipline methods, and physical punishment. The study also informs the role of marriage in Islam and the adopted concepts and theories of Western sociological literature. Findings show that authoritative parenting was the most predominant parenting style among study participants. The study also revealed that those who frequently read the Qur'an tended to be less authoritarian. Parents that experienced physical punishment as a child and who think Islam allows spanking were more likely to sponsor an authoritarian parenting style. The study findings provide insights into the complex roles of religion and parenting in Muslim groups.
Title: Exploring Theology and Practice in Islamic Parenting.
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Name(s): Akin, Mergin, Author
Rivera, Fernando, Committee Chair
Grauerholz, Elizabeth, Committee Member
Gay, David, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of this study is to explore Muslims' parenting styles and determine how factors such as religion, education, income, physical and verbal punishment experienced as a child, and the perception of Islamic childrearing influence their parenting styles. The research focuses on the main tenets of parenting in the Islamic tradition such as fatherhood, motherhood, children's and parent's rights and responsibilities, discipline methods, and physical punishment. The study also informs the role of marriage in Islam and the adopted concepts and theories of Western sociological literature. Findings show that authoritative parenting was the most predominant parenting style among study participants. The study also revealed that those who frequently read the Qur'an tended to be less authoritarian. Parents that experienced physical punishment as a child and who think Islam allows spanking were more likely to sponsor an authoritarian parenting style. The study findings provide insights into the complex roles of religion and parenting in Muslim groups.
Identifier: CFE0004493 (IID), ucf:49295 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-12-01
M.A.
Sciences, Sociology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): sociology -- parenting styles -- muslim -- Muslim parenting styles -- children -- physical punishment -- child discipline
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004493
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-12-15
Host Institution: UCF

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