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The use of video game achievements to enhance player performance, self-efficacy, and motivation

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Date Issued:
2011
Abstract/Description:
A taxonomy of achievement design features that exist currently in video game systems was created in order to evaluate the current the state of the art in achievement design. From the taxonomy of design features multiple mechanisms of action that influence player behavior were identified. These mechanisms lead to a predictive model that can guide the designs of achievements in order to improve performance, self-efficacy and motivation in players.Expected, unexpected, and incremental achievements were tested. Notifications occurring before and after earning an achievement were also tested. In addition to testing individual mechanisms of action a (")combined achievement(") was created with multiple mechanisms added that were hand-picked. For testing purposes the model was applied to achievements that were inserted into an instructional game. The results of the study revealed that individual mechanisms of action had little effect on players while multiple mechanisms in a combined achievement caused significant improvements in several categories. The limitations of the current study, as well as, plans for future study are also discussed.
Title: The use of video game achievements to enhance player performance, self-efficacy, and motivation.
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Name(s): Blair, Lucas, Author
Bowers, Clint, Committee Chair
Cannon-Bowers, Janis, Committee Member
McDaniel, Rudy, Committee Member
Kincaid, John, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2011
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: A taxonomy of achievement design features that exist currently in video game systems was created in order to evaluate the current the state of the art in achievement design. From the taxonomy of design features multiple mechanisms of action that influence player behavior were identified. These mechanisms lead to a predictive model that can guide the designs of achievements in order to improve performance, self-efficacy and motivation in players.Expected, unexpected, and incremental achievements were tested. Notifications occurring before and after earning an achievement were also tested. In addition to testing individual mechanisms of action a (")combined achievement(") was created with multiple mechanisms added that were hand-picked. For testing purposes the model was applied to achievements that were inserted into an instructional game. The results of the study revealed that individual mechanisms of action had little effect on players while multiple mechanisms in a combined achievement caused significant improvements in several categories. The limitations of the current study, as well as, plans for future study are also discussed.
Identifier: CFE0004471 (IID), ucf:49297 (fedora)
Note(s): 2011-12-01
Ph.D.
Sciences, Psychology
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Game design -- achievement -- performance -- learning -- motivation
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004471
Restrictions on Access: campus 2013-06-15
Host Institution: UCF

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