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Analyzing action game players' performance during distracted driving

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
Driving is a complex task that is highly reliant on attention. Research states that distrac-tions cause performance errors thus it is important to find ways to reduce driver distraction or assist drivers with ways to improve their cognitive resources if distraction is unavoidable. Moreover, research indicates that action video game players outperform non-players on lab-based tests of visual and cognitive abilities. However, research also exists that is contrary to these find-ings. Some researchers suggest that methodological deficiencies could be the cause of the significant findings in the literature. With such fervor of debate on the subject, the question re-mains of whether players acquire skills through playing action video games and if so can these games be used as research or training tools to enhance performance on realistic tasks. To answer this question, 45 male participants were tested using psychometric measures of spatial ability (Spatial orientation and visualization) and failures of attention (Cognitive Failures Question-naire), and then all participants drove four 10-minute drives in a driving simulator. The first drive was a practice, followed by a control drive. Participants were then distracted using a hands free phone conversation. Following that, participants completed a final control drive. Both overall video game experience and action video game experience was positively related to higher spatial ability scores. Additionally, participants with higher action game experience exhibited fewer lane deviations during driving overall, but not during the distraction condition. On the other hand, participants with higher spatial ability scores exhibited fewer lane deviations during the distraction condition, but not during the control drives. Furthermore, action video game ex-perience was not significant on the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. Therefore, it was conclud-ed that individuals who have higher action game experience do not show improvements on any abilities of attention tested in this study. However, higher experience action video game players may perform better in simulated environments than those with less experience.
Title: Analyzing action game players' performance during distracted driving.
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Name(s): Rupp, Michael, Author
Smither, Janan, Committee Chair
Mouloua, Mustapha, Committee CoChair
Mcconnell, Daniel, Committee Member
Kincaid, John, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Driving is a complex task that is highly reliant on attention. Research states that distrac-tions cause performance errors thus it is important to find ways to reduce driver distraction or assist drivers with ways to improve their cognitive resources if distraction is unavoidable. Moreover, research indicates that action video game players outperform non-players on lab-based tests of visual and cognitive abilities. However, research also exists that is contrary to these find-ings. Some researchers suggest that methodological deficiencies could be the cause of the significant findings in the literature. With such fervor of debate on the subject, the question re-mains of whether players acquire skills through playing action video games and if so can these games be used as research or training tools to enhance performance on realistic tasks. To answer this question, 45 male participants were tested using psychometric measures of spatial ability (Spatial orientation and visualization) and failures of attention (Cognitive Failures Question-naire), and then all participants drove four 10-minute drives in a driving simulator. The first drive was a practice, followed by a control drive. Participants were then distracted using a hands free phone conversation. Following that, participants completed a final control drive. Both overall video game experience and action video game experience was positively related to higher spatial ability scores. Additionally, participants with higher action game experience exhibited fewer lane deviations during driving overall, but not during the distraction condition. On the other hand, participants with higher spatial ability scores exhibited fewer lane deviations during the distraction condition, but not during the control drives. Furthermore, action video game ex-perience was not significant on the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. Therefore, it was conclud-ed that individuals who have higher action game experience do not show improvements on any abilities of attention tested in this study. However, higher experience action video game players may perform better in simulated environments than those with less experience.
Identifier: CFE0004434 (IID), ucf:49360 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-08-01
M.S.
Sciences, Psychology
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Action Games -- Driving -- Distraction
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004434
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-08-15
Host Institution: UCF

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