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To The CORE: The Congress of Racial Equality, the Seattle Civil Rights Movement, and the Shift to Black Militancy

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
This thesis compares the history of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) to that of its Seattle chapter. The study traces the entire history of CORE from 1942-1968 as well as the history of Seattle CORE from 1961-1968. The goal of this examination is to identify why Seattle CORE successfully fended off the movement for black militancy and consequently why national CORE failed to do so. Juxtaposing the two radically different histories shows an integrated organization, bureaucratic leadership, a plan of action based on nonviolent actions, and a strong attachment to the black community were the central reasons for the success of Seattle CORE, and conversely, these areas were why national CORE struggled. Moreover, this study shows the events and failures over the first two decades created a susceptible environment for the organization to abandon CORE's nonviolent ideology and the subsequent disintegration of the Congress of Racial Equality as the walls of Jim Crow broke down.
Title: To The CORE: The Congress of Racial Equality, the Seattle Civil Rights Movement, and the Shift to Black Militancy.
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Name(s): Jimenez, Michael, Author
Lester, Connie, Committee Chair
Walters, Lori, Committee Member
Walker, Ezekiel, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This thesis compares the history of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) to that of its Seattle chapter. The study traces the entire history of CORE from 1942-1968 as well as the history of Seattle CORE from 1961-1968. The goal of this examination is to identify why Seattle CORE successfully fended off the movement for black militancy and consequently why national CORE failed to do so. Juxtaposing the two radically different histories shows an integrated organization, bureaucratic leadership, a plan of action based on nonviolent actions, and a strong attachment to the black community were the central reasons for the success of Seattle CORE, and conversely, these areas were why national CORE struggled. Moreover, this study shows the events and failures over the first two decades created a susceptible environment for the organization to abandon CORE's nonviolent ideology and the subsequent disintegration of the Congress of Racial Equality as the walls of Jim Crow broke down.
Identifier: CFE0004327 (IID), ucf:49411 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, History
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Civil Rights -- Congress of Racial Equality -- Seattle -- Freedom Rides -- CORE -- black nationalism -- black militancy -- James Farmer
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004327
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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