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The Amish Farm in Transition: The Amish Response to Modernization in Northern Indiana, 1900-1920

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
This study explored the responses of Amish agrarians in northern Indiana to the mechanization and modernization of rural life in the early twentieth century. This period was marked by a shift towards agribusiness as well as the increased usage of farm machines. In addition to the increased emphasis on farm efficiency, reformers sought to modernize or update rural life. Within the context of these transformations, the Amish maintained their identity by exploring the necessity and the consequences of adapting to life in the modern world. Their responses to modernization defined not only their cultural boundaries in the modern world but also created their identity in twentieth century America. In stark contrast to the ideal of the independent farmer, the Amish used the strength of their community (both Amish and non-Amish) and their agrarian roots to endure and overcome the challenging events of the early twentieth century. The purpose of this study was to expand the scholarship of Amish studies in northern Indiana as well as place the Amish experience within the context of agrarian historiography. Resources used to examine this period included Amish writings, farm publications from Indiana and data from the agricultural census.
Title: The Amish Farm in Transition: The Amish Response to Modernization in Northern Indiana, 1900-1920.
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Name(s): Grover, Amy, Author
Lester, Connie, Committee Chair
Larson, Peter, Committee Member
Martinez Fernandez, Luis, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study explored the responses of Amish agrarians in northern Indiana to the mechanization and modernization of rural life in the early twentieth century. This period was marked by a shift towards agribusiness as well as the increased usage of farm machines. In addition to the increased emphasis on farm efficiency, reformers sought to modernize or update rural life. Within the context of these transformations, the Amish maintained their identity by exploring the necessity and the consequences of adapting to life in the modern world. Their responses to modernization defined not only their cultural boundaries in the modern world but also created their identity in twentieth century America. In stark contrast to the ideal of the independent farmer, the Amish used the strength of their community (both Amish and non-Amish) and their agrarian roots to endure and overcome the challenging events of the early twentieth century. The purpose of this study was to expand the scholarship of Amish studies in northern Indiana as well as place the Amish experience within the context of agrarian historiography. Resources used to examine this period included Amish writings, farm publications from Indiana and data from the agricultural census.
Identifier: CFE0004339 (IID), ucf:49456 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
M.A.
Arts and Humanities, History
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): Amish -- agriculture -- twentieth century
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004339
Restrictions on Access: campus 2013-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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