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Towards Evolving More Brain-Like Artificial Neural Networks

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
An ambitious long-term goal for neuroevolution, which studies how artificial evolutionary processes can be driven to produce brain-like structures, is to evolve neurocontrollers with a high density of neurons and connections that can adapt and learn from past experience. Yet while neuroevolution has produced successful results in a variety of domains, the scale of natural brains remains far beyond reach. In this dissertation two extensions to the recently introduced Hypercube-based NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies (HyperNEAT) approach are presented that are a step towards more brain-like artificial neural networks (ANNs). First, HyperNEAT is extended to evolve plastic ANNs that can learn from past experience. This new approach, called adaptive HyperNEAT, allows not only patterns of weights across the connectivity of an ANN to be generated by a function of its geometry, but also patterns of arbitrary local learning rules. Second, evolvable-substrate HyperNEAT (ES-HyperNEAT) is introduced, which relieves the user from deciding where the hidden nodes should be placed in a geometry that is potentially infinitely dense. This approach not only can evolve the location of every neuron in the network, but also can represent regions of varying density, which means resolution can increase holistically over evolution. The combined approach, adaptive ES-HyperNEAT, unifies for the first time in neuroevolution the abilities to indirectly encode connectivity through geometry, generate patterns of heterogeneous plasticity, and simultaneously encode the density and placement of nodes in space. The dissertation culminates in a major application domain that takes a step towards the general goal of adaptive neurocontrollers for legged locomotion.
Title: Towards Evolving More Brain-Like Artificial Neural Networks.
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Name(s): Risi, Sebastian, Author
Stanley, Kenneth, Committee Chair
Hughes, Charles, Committee Member
Sukthankar, Gita, Committee Member
Wiegand, Rudolf, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: An ambitious long-term goal for neuroevolution, which studies how artificial evolutionary processes can be driven to produce brain-like structures, is to evolve neurocontrollers with a high density of neurons and connections that can adapt and learn from past experience. Yet while neuroevolution has produced successful results in a variety of domains, the scale of natural brains remains far beyond reach. In this dissertation two extensions to the recently introduced Hypercube-based NeuroEvolution of Augmenting Topologies (HyperNEAT) approach are presented that are a step towards more brain-like artificial neural networks (ANNs). First, HyperNEAT is extended to evolve plastic ANNs that can learn from past experience. This new approach, called adaptive HyperNEAT, allows not only patterns of weights across the connectivity of an ANN to be generated by a function of its geometry, but also patterns of arbitrary local learning rules. Second, evolvable-substrate HyperNEAT (ES-HyperNEAT) is introduced, which relieves the user from deciding where the hidden nodes should be placed in a geometry that is potentially infinitely dense. This approach not only can evolve the location of every neuron in the network, but also can represent regions of varying density, which means resolution can increase holistically over evolution. The combined approach, adaptive ES-HyperNEAT, unifies for the first time in neuroevolution the abilities to indirectly encode connectivity through geometry, generate patterns of heterogeneous plasticity, and simultaneously encode the density and placement of nodes in space. The dissertation culminates in a major application domain that takes a step towards the general goal of adaptive neurocontrollers for legged locomotion.
Identifier: CFE0004287 (IID), ucf:49477 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
Ph.D.
Engineering and Computer Science, Computer Science
Doctoral
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): NEAT -- HyperNEAT -- Neuroevolution -- Artificial Neural Networks -- Generative Encodings -- Artificial Evolution
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004287
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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