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Establishing Difference: The Gendering and Racialization of Power in Genocide

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Date Issued:
2012
Abstract/Description:
This thesis is designed to delve deeper into perceptions of identity, specifically gender and racial identity, the power relationship that emerges as each of these switches is reached in the progression towards genocide, and the effects of these perceptions during and after the genocide takes place. The primary question addressed is whether the power relationship that emerges as a result of these pre-genocidal stages becomes gendered and racialized due to perceptions rooted in a male-dominated hierarchy and a belief in the superiority of one ethnicity over another. The primary goal of this thesis is to analyze the power relationship in the pre-genocide and genocide stages between the perpetrator and the victim on the macro or group level and the micro or individual level. Using the case studies of the Balkan genocides, the Sudanese genocides of Nuba and Darfur, and the 1994 Rwandan genocide, this thesis will attempt to illustrate the idea that the identities of both perpetrator and victim are constructed in order for one to wield power over the other. Within each case study, genocidal tools such as genocidal rape, gendercide, propaganda and indoctrination are addressed in their relation to the gendering and racializing of power relationships in genocide. The effects of the Balkan, Sudanese, and Rwandan genocides are still felt by both survivors and perpetrators, and continue to play a role in how the groups relate to one another, and the case of the Sudanese genocides is still ongoing.
Title: Establishing Difference: The Gendering and Racialization of Power in Genocide.
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Name(s): Welsh, Erin, Author
Morales, Waltraud, Committee Chair
Winton, Mark, Committee Member
Sadri, Houman, Committee Member
, Committee Member
University of Central Florida, Degree Grantor
Type of Resource: text
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: University of Central Florida
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This thesis is designed to delve deeper into perceptions of identity, specifically gender and racial identity, the power relationship that emerges as each of these switches is reached in the progression towards genocide, and the effects of these perceptions during and after the genocide takes place. The primary question addressed is whether the power relationship that emerges as a result of these pre-genocidal stages becomes gendered and racialized due to perceptions rooted in a male-dominated hierarchy and a belief in the superiority of one ethnicity over another. The primary goal of this thesis is to analyze the power relationship in the pre-genocide and genocide stages between the perpetrator and the victim on the macro or group level and the micro or individual level. Using the case studies of the Balkan genocides, the Sudanese genocides of Nuba and Darfur, and the 1994 Rwandan genocide, this thesis will attempt to illustrate the idea that the identities of both perpetrator and victim are constructed in order for one to wield power over the other. Within each case study, genocidal tools such as genocidal rape, gendercide, propaganda and indoctrination are addressed in their relation to the gendering and racializing of power relationships in genocide. The effects of the Balkan, Sudanese, and Rwandan genocides are still felt by both survivors and perpetrators, and continue to play a role in how the groups relate to one another, and the case of the Sudanese genocides is still ongoing.
Identifier: CFE0004297 (IID), ucf:49491 (fedora)
Note(s): 2012-05-01
M.A.
Sciences, Political Science
Masters
This record was generated from author submitted information.
Subject(s): genocide -- gender -- identity -- ethnicity
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/ucf/fd/CFE0004297
Restrictions on Access: public 2012-05-15
Host Institution: UCF

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